“What say you?” The 1 minute challenge (6)

“A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer”
Bruce Lee

Here is some interesting information I found online about the composer behind this week’s puzzle:
“M. Brede (. M. stands for “Mister” Brede’s chess problem were in “M. Brede” began in 1841 in Chess Player’s Chronicle , and from 1843 in the Illustrated London News published), which is Ferdinand Julius Brede (1799 or 1800 Stettin – 15.12.1849 Altona, today a district of Hamburg). Brede was an accountant at Altona’s merchant Georg Friedrich Baur. Baur was the owner of the Baurspark named after him in today’s Hamburg district of Blankenese. Brede also worked as a writer under the pseudonym de Fibre and as a chess composer. Brede was a member of the Hamburg Chess Club ( Chess Player’s Chronicle 1841, page 241 “Problem No. 131 By M. Brede, of the Hamburgh Chess Club.” In 1844, Brede gave the almanac to friends from the chess game, a collection of self-made chess pieces Brede is the author of the variant problem.”
Book: “Chess in 19th century newspapers 210 chess assignments and 200 pictures.”
Author: Elke Rehder
Place of publication: Homburg, Publisher: EDITION JUNG, Publication year: 2014. 340 pages, format DIN A5, binded. ISBN 978-3-933648-54-9.

In those days puzzle solving challenges would sound something like:
“If you find the key to this position in ten minutes, we shall think of you as a very promising aspirant for Caïssa’s honours”
Today we are much stronger/ better as a community and we can solve them a lot faster, don’t we? A quick reminder about how to do it:

  • Have a look at the position for 1 minute (watch the clock)
  • Think about the choices in front of you and pick the one you feel it is right
  • Verify it in your mind the best you can
  • Compare it with the solution

Are you ready? Here it is:

Even if this is about tactics and raw calculations, tactics do not happen out of the blue. They happen when the position is ripe, so the first step needed is to recognize it being as such. We are used to this by now:

  • Black has winning material advantage
  • White still has enough fire power to attack Kg8 and that includes: Nd5, Qf4, Rg2 and the g6-pawn
  • Black’s heavy pieces (queen and both rooks) are away on the queen side for the moment
  • The only Black piece defending its king is Be6; that means White’s attackers outnumber the defenders at least 3 to 1, giving us a first indication the attack has a chance to succeed
  • Both moves 1. Ne7+ … and 1. gxh7+ … look good, so how do we decide which one to go with? To choose correctly, we need to see the difference between the two
  • Looking carefully at each option move, we should see a couple of important details:
    1. Ne7+ … opens the diagonal a2-g8, giving Qa2 a way to come to the defence of its king
    1. gxh7 … eliminates one of the pawns defending their king and still keeps Qa2 away

Conclusion: 1. gxh7 … is the move winning faster; now we can start calculating the moves. The second move is key and I am sure you can see it now. Enjoy the complete solution!

Valer Eugen Demian

Difficult Pairings

Everybody gets difficult pairings now and then. One of the toughest situations is if you have to play a very young player who is also very good; it’s very embarrassing to lose.

In the Crewe Major last weekend I had to play one of the best 8-year-old players in the World whose ECF grade is 150 already. Fortunately I managed to win after playing one of my best games of the year. It looks like I was strongly motivated!

Sam Davies

The Third Missed Fork

Yet another game, yet another White, yet another QGD Exchange, and yet another missed fork. They say things come in threes.

This game was another rematch: against Ealing and Richmond Junior Alfie Onslow, who had beaten me at the start of the season, as well as in the previous season. Would it be third time lucky?

1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Nf6

I think this isn’t part of Alfie’s regular repertoire. I seem to recall a game in an informal blitz tournament when he played the King’s Indian, which I met with the Smyslov variation. Although his moves were all reasonable he seemed unfamiliar with the opening and was soon some way behind on the clock.

4. cxd5 exd5
5. Bg5 Bb4

Another Bb4 rather than Be7, so I’ll be playing in the centre rather than going for a minority attack.

6. e3 O-O
7. Nf3 h6
8. Bh4 Qd6
9. Bd3 Ne4
10. Qc2 Bf5
11. O-O Bxc3
12. bxc3 g5
13. Bg3 Nxg3
14. hxg3 Bxd3
15. Qxd3 Nd7
16. Rab1 Nb6

16… b6 would have been more to the point as he wants to play c5. Now my knight should have advanced to e5 rather than retreating. I was probably scared of f6, for no very good reason. Of course an immediate 17. Ne5 f6 would lose at once to 18. Qg6+.

17. Nd2 c5
18. c4

A conflict in the centre of the board. Both players have to make decisions about pawn captures here. Waiting a bit, as Black decided to do, was probably not the right idea: taking on c4 would have been better.

18… Rad8
19. dxc5

A miscalculation. Instead 19. cxd5 followed by Ne4, hitting all sorts of juicy squares (c5, d6, f6) would have given me some advantage.

19… Qxc5
20. Rb5

I was hoping I was winning a pawn with this move, but in fact I’m losing a pawn: I’d completely missed Black’s reply. It’s the usual short circuit. I attack my opponent’s queen and assume he’s going to move it, not looking at anything else.

20… dxc4
21. Qb1

21. Qxd8 was an alternative which, of course, I didn’t consider at all.

21… Qc6
22. Nf3 c3
23. Rc1

Blundering into a position you might have seen before. 23. Rb3 was the correct move, when I might eventually be able to win the c-pawn.

23… Rd6

But Alfie misses the chance for a winning tactic: 23… Rd1+ 23. Rxd1 (or 23. Kh2 Rxc1 24. Qxc1 Qxb5) c2 24. Rxb6 axb6 25. Qc1 cxd1Q+ 26. Qxd1 when Black is the exchange ahead.

24. Nd4 Qc7
25. Rb3 Rxd4

Running low on time, he switches to desperation mode. There was no need for this: after 25… Qd7 White is only slightly better.

26. exd4 Rc8
27. Rbxc3 Qxc3
28. Rxc3 Rxc3

Now it’s easy for me as long as I keep a clear head.

29. Qe4 Rc1+
30. Kh2 Rd1
31. Qxb7 Rxd4
32. Qb8+ Kh7
33. Qxa7 Ra4
34. Qxf7+ Kh8
35. Qf6+ Kh7
36. Qxb6 Rxa2
37. Qb7+

I’d worked out a long sequence of checks ending up with Qf7+ forking king and rook, but Alfie pointed out that I could have played Qb1+ immediately – yet another missed fork! Anyway, he resigned here.

One of the few games I played last season in which I handled the clock better than my opponent. A gratifying win against a strong opponent, but ultimately frustrating yet again because of the missed tactic.

Richard James

This Piano is No Joke!

Many amateur chess players (especially Americans) mispronounce the names of chess openings and foreign chess players. “Giuoco” is pronounced like joke-o. Giuoco Piano means go easy game. This opening and its variants are also called “The Italian Game”.

My opponent blundered while transitioning from the opening to the middle game. I can’t say that any one move was responsible for his loss.


Mike Serovey

Getting Selected

Getting in the right events is vital for chess players who want to improve and/or make a name for themselves. When selection is also involved this issue can become very stressful, from local junior events to national teams.

Chess is fortunate in this regard in that it has ratings. But what if they are not applied with iron consistency or even not used at all? Certainly there are cases in which players who would have been the ‘rating choice’ have been ‘overlooked’.

There can be reasons for selecting a lower rated player. But because of issues such as fairness, cliques and the potential abuse of power, it is better for selections to be made with a standard formula.

What should someone do if they feel they are being unfairly treated? Vigorous complaint can certainly work, though it can get them labelled as a ‘trouble maker’. A more effective response is just to smile and work harder on chess, this will probably translate into a higher rating after which it will be hard for selectors to ignore without looking blatantly unfair.

Nigel Davies

Mednis Principles (2)

“With major pieces (queen or rook) on the board, having bishops on opposite colors favors the side with an attack.”
Edmar Mednis

A couple of nice articles about these principles can be reviewed HERE and HERE
SIM Michael R Freeman is a very strong ICCF player from Darwin, New Zealand. The fact he has been able to perform at around 2500 correspondence chess rating since 2009 is a high accomplishment not many are capable of. He is also FIDE-CM over the board and this summer he had the opportunity to play in the 8th IGB International Seniors Open Chess Championship 2017, Malaysia. Michael was kind to share interesting positions from his games along the way and I liked one in particular. The position was extremely interesting and the additional thoughts and comments by Michael caught my attention and made me take a closer look. We also had a very instructive online discussion about it; in the end can say for sure I learned more about opposite bishops endgames. Here it is with comments as indicated:

Of course Mednis principles apply here perfectly. White was pressing all along and that opened the door for a nice ending. Personally I think this is also an excellent example of how we need to pay attention to what is going on until the opponent has signed the scoresheet. Michael could have been rattled by the missed chances or by the tough defence he had to face up to that point; also he might have thought this was a done deal with those 2 passed pawns ready to promote. Any of us in his shoes would have had to consider 1… Bc5 as the best reply and gather our last drops of energy to figure out the winning idea with Bb5 hanging. He did it and was rewarded for it. Below is the full game score. Thank you Michael for sharing it with us!

Valer Eugen Demian

Winning A Dodgy Endgame

My position was not that great when I went into this endgame with 9…Qxb3, mainly because of White’s pressure on the open a-file. But when he failed to capitalize on this I gradually consolidated my position with 23…a5! being an important move. After more ups and downs I finally won with just a couple of minutes left on the clock.

Sam Davies

The Second Missed Fork

Another game, another White, another Queen’s Gambit Exchange (well, sort of), another missed fork.

1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Bb4
4. Nf3 Nf6

Black chooses the Ragosin System. He’s planning to meet Qa4+ with Nc6 when you might argue that both the white queen and the knight on c6 are misplaced. Of course Bg5 and e3 are both fine but instead I exchange at once.

5. cxd5 Bxc3+

A very strange decision, giving me an extra centre pawn as well as the two bishops. White has a very large plus score from this position.

6. bxc3 exd5
7. Bg5 h6
8. Bh4 Bf5
9. Qb3 b6

The computer prefers to give up the b-pawn with Nbd7, which it considers equal. Now I could trade on f6, when Black has to double his f-pawns to avoid losing a pawn, but I preferred to wait to see if he castled.

10. e3 O-O
11. Bxf6 gxf6
12. Be2

I might have played c4 here.

12… Nc6
13. O-O Na5
14. Qa4

And now I might have played Qd1, followed by Bd3 to trade off the bishops. The queen’s not so well placed here.

14… c6
15. Nh4 Be4
16. f3

16. Bg4 followed by Bf5 was better, still trying to trade bishops. I think I’d just failed to notice that the black bishop had the h7 square available.

16… Bh7
17. g3

The immediate e4, sacrificing a pawn to open lines, was probably a better idea. After 17… Re8 Black would have been close to equality. One idea will be b5 followed by Nc4 (you might remember that Black might have gone for the same idea in the game I showed you last week: something for me to remember and learn from). Black vacillates a bit over the next few moves before hitting on the right plan.

17… Qe7
18. Ng2 Kh8
19. Qd1 Rae8
20. Qd2 Kg7
21. Rae1 f5
22. Bd3 b5
23. Qc2 Qg5
24. g4

Trying to be clever but we both missed something. After 24… fxg4 25. Bxh7 f5 Black will regain the piece with a position the computer assesses as equal.

24… Nc4
25. Bxf5

Another possibility here was 25. h4 Qf6 26. gxf5, but, as usual, I seize the first opportunity to trade queens.

25… Bxf5
26. Qxf5 Qxf5
27. gxf5 Rg8
28. Kf2

28. e4 was better. Here Black should have preferred 28… Kf6 29. e4 Nd2, but instead creates a cheap threat.

28… Nb2
29. Rb1

Better was 29. Nf4 Kf6 30. e4

29… Nc4
30. Rfe1 Kf6
31. e4 dxe4
32. fxe4 Nd2
33. e5+ Kxf5
34. Rbc1 Ne4+
35. Kf3 Ng5+

The black knight heads in the wrong direction. 35… Nd2+ was correct.

36. Kf2

And the white king also heads in the wrong direction. 36. Ke3 was better for White, not blocking the f-file, but now Black could equalise with 36… f6. This is a rather tricky position, and, without too much time left on the clock, the inaccuracies are, at this level, understandable.

36… Nh3+
37. Kf3 h5
38. Ne3+ Ke6
39. c4 Ng5+

The computer prefers b4 here. The checks force White’s king to a better square.

40. Kf4 Nh3+
41. Kf3 Ng5+
42. Ke2

Untypically, but correctly, turning down a possible repetition.

42… b4
43. Kd3 Rd8
44. Rf1 Rg6

A fatal error. He had to play Kd7 to clear the e6 square for the knight.

45. h4 Nh3
46. Rf3

The immediate Rf5 was winning, but instead I decided to force the knight to what I thought was an even worse square first.

46.. Ng1
47. Rf5

But this move is now a blunder. This is the position you might have seen before. I’d overlooked the tactic 47… Rxd4+ 48. Rxd4 Ne2+ with Black for preference, although White can probably hold. I suppose it’s not so easy. It’s quite an unusual position, it appears, superficially, that Black has no counterplay, and the clock is running down. I should have learnt the idea from my previous game, though. Luckily for me, my opponent didn’t notice it either.

I was still winning with either Rff1 or Rf2 here, but Rf4 would have been less clear. The reason is that, after, say, 47. Rf2 f6 48. d5+ Kxe5, White wins at once with 49. Nf5, and Black has to give up a rook to avoid immediate mate.

47… Nh3

Now White’s centre pawns are too strong. The rest of the game can pass without comment.

48. Rcf1 Rf8
49. d5+ cxd5
50. cxd5+ Ke7
51. Rxh5 Rc8
52. Rh7 Rc3+
53. Kd2 Ra6
54. Rhxf7+ Kd8
55. Rf8+ Kc7
56. R1f7+ Kb6
57. Rf6+ Ka5
58. Rxa6+ Kxa6
59. e6 Ra3
60. e7 Rxa2+
61. Kc1 Ka5
62. e8=Q Ng1
63. Nc4+ 1-0