10,000 Hours Is Just Part of the Puzzle

This recent article lends some important clarification to the so-called 10,000 hour rule. Of course some of us have been aware of the importance of talent for some time, especially after post mortem analysis with a young Vishwanathan Anand. I understood that I’d never be as quick sighted as him or other top players even with 100,000 hours.

Having said that my many years of chess teaching has convinced me that what most people are missing is practice time. Often it is the opportunity that’s the problem, especially for those with jobs and families. But most usually it’s a lack of willingness to put as much time in as possible and over an extended period.

People try to circumvent this truth with quick fix methods that just don’t work. But most people can make good progress over time if they put 7-10 hours a week in and focus on core skills.

Nigel Davies

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About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days he teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 14 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game.