Author Archives: NigelD

About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days he teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 13 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game.

Dear Professor Verghese…

Due to some recent controversy on the matter I have been considering writing to Professor Verghese about his Alzheimer’s study. Although ‘board games’ were cited as being associated with a lower risk of dementia, would this happen to include chess?

There was a certain lack of clarity on the matter, so I guess he might have meant that Monopoly and Cluedo were the ones that were really good for the brain. But after mulling it over for a while I decided that this would be a really stupid question. The best that would have happened is that the prof would have had good chuckle. There again I might spark a new line of research on chess players and pedantry.

Chess is good for the mind, and there’s an overwhelming mass of data and anecdotal evidence to support this view. If anyone doubts this they should research the popular practice of giving homework, which is doled out to kids with far less evidence than we have for the benefits of chess. Meanwhile it’s clear that pedants are annoying, so much so that the best you can hope for is escape from their presence without them hating you and wanting to show your ‘errors’ to the World. Of course I’m sure that many chess players have valid conditions that cause their pedantry, such as obsessive compulsive disorder and/or Asperger’s. But whatever the excuse (and there are chess people with Asperger’s and/or OCD who make brilliant positive contributions), pedantry shouldn’t be the main face that chess shows to the World. It puts people off, from potential chess club members to sponsors.

Unfortunately pedants often seem to be those who are most active on blogs, forums and in chess politics, they just have to put the world to rights if only in a hypothetical way. Everything is criticism, negativity and pet whinges, nowhere will you find evidence of creation. So they don’t organize tournaments, don’t improve and don’t get others involved or on the road to success. They seek only to belittle the achievements of others and glory in the magnificence of their critique.

I would like to be innocent of these crimes myself but unfortunately I am not. I have moaned and whinged and criticized to the applause of my peers and felt good about doing so. But I came to realize that this was all about me, my own failings, fear of success and resentment of those who actually did succeed. And it’s interesting to note that around the time I changed things around and got the GM title I was also into inspirational books such as Scott-Peck’s A Road Less Traveled and People of the Lie.

I think that if I’ve managed to change then so can others, or at least they can try. And if anyone would like specifics on how to move their minds then please contact me and I’ll publish specific methods in subsequent articles.

Nigel Davies

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Inventing Your Own Lines

A great way to improve your chess is to try inventing your own lines. Unlike the ‘monkey see, monkey do’ approach to openings that many adopt, trying to find new ideas engages and helps develop chess skills. You need to understand typical plans and then find ways to implement them on the board.

Is it necessary to find something completely new in order to be inventive? No. You can take an established line and try to come up with some new wrinkles later on, say around move 10 or 12. Of course it helps if the lines you investigate are not the most fashionable ones as these can get picked apart rather exhaustively.

One of my own efforts in this field was the development of 2.d3 against the Sicilian (1.e4 c5). I’d seen an article by Lawrence Day on ‘big clamp’ formations and wanted to formalize his strategic concepts to create an anti-Sicilian repertoire. It worked quite well and I subsequently made a video on it for Foxy Openings which can now be found at my Tiger Chess site.

Here’s some more about the 2.d3 video which you can add to your Tiger Chess membership whether you’re a full or video member:

Nigel Davies

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Converting The French Into A Universal Repertoire

One of the useful things about playing the French is that it can be fairly easily turned into a low maintenance universal repertoire. A few years ago I made a DVD for Chessbase on this topic in which Black would combine the French with Bogo-Indian type lines, meeting 1.d4 with 1…e6 and then on 2.c4 playing 2…Bb4+. The emphasis here was on solidity rather than anything else and the French lines I gave featured the Romanishin System with 3…Be7 against 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 or 3.Nd2 together with super solid lines of the Bogo. This won’t be everyone’s cup of tea but it’s a good way to get a universal 1…e6 repertoire up and running.

For more adventurous souls I recently made this one in which the Owens Defence is used as a supplement to the French. I don’t recommend the Owens against 1.e4 because of 1…b6 2.d4 Bb7 3.Nd2, but it can be playable after 1.d4 e6 2.c4 b6. Here’s a sample that’s on Youtube:

Finally there’s a more traditional option for Black is to combine the French and the Dutch, and this you can do with playing 1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5, which has the advantage of avoiding gambit lines like the Staunton (1.d4 f5 2.e4!?) plus other anti-Dutch ideas. If you’d like to go this route I show the ideas on this video at my Tiger Chess site:

Remember that players at club level really just need plans, ideas and concepts whilst they get on board an opening, in my opinion it’s plain madness for them to buy a huge tome full of variations played and analyzed by top GMs. I do explain this and more on my Tiger Chess site with some video lessons that are available to both full and video members.

Nigel Davies

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Tiger Chess Analysis Training

One of the most popular features at my Tiger Chess site is the recently introduced Analysis Training feature. It is very different to tactical chess problems of the ‘White to play and win’ genre in that the positions may be tactical or strategic in nature and call for a quite different type of thinking to the usual calculation of forcing moves.

Here’s my Youtube video about it:

Nigel Davies

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The Polgar Variant

This new film by the Israeli film-maker Yossi Aviram looks interesting. Meanwhile it’s interesting to reflect that all three sisters are now retired from tournament play.

Nigel Davies

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The Tiger Chess Endgame Course

Further to my post yesterday on the Tiger Chess Strategy Course, here’s how the Tiger Chess Endgame Course works. Once again it is included with the £4.95 Full Membership fee and provides an easy and very thorough way to learn the endgame:

Nigel Davies

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