Author Archives: NigelD

About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days he teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 14 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game.

The Comeback Trail, Part 15

Although my first tournaments back were fairly successful (first place in the Rhyl and South Lakes Open sections) I was back as a spectator for the Heywood Congress. I’m going through a busy patch with non chess commitments that started just after the South Lakes event. It’s good to sense if you are taking too much on and this was one of those moments.

It’s also good to look for flaws in your play, even if you have been doing well. The weaknesses are certainly there as I had not had time to do any serious preparation, relying instead on improvisation. This can be OK up to a certain level but there’s a point at which it becomes a serious problem. Against well prepared professional players you will certainly get outgunned in the early stages, struggling to get a decent game as Black and having them equalize easily when you are White. And this is compounded if your games end up on databases so that people can study them with the help of modern technology.

I’ll be out of action in July as well but should soon get time to start working on my game. A break isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it’s better to plan than to charge ahead out of compulsion.

Nigel Davies

Aronian – Carlsen, Norway 2017

This game has already getting well known but it’s worth reposting here, Levon Aronian wins really brilliantly against the reigning World Champion, Magnus Carlsen. Besides the later fireworks the move 10.Bd3-c2 is worth noting, creating problems for Black as Peter Svidler explains:

Nigel Davies

The Comeback Trail, Part 14

Last weekend I managed to follow up my previous first place in the Rhyl Open with another one in the South Lakes Open. After taking a bye on the Friday night I won the rest of my games, my opponents including FIDE Masters Joe McPhillips and Charlie Storey.

The game against Storey was interesting, a dramatic last round encounter in which White sacrificed a piece early on. I wasn’t sure at the time if 10.Qe2 was inspiration or a reluctance to retreat the knight after having played 8.Nb5. Certainly White gets compensation but I’d need some convincing that it’s enough. Later on I was baffled by White’s late resignation when we both had oodles of time on the clock, though perhaps it was through a sense of disappointment about the outcome.

Here anyway is the game:

My son Sam also did very well in the Major, scoring a win and three draws and recording his best ever rating performance (179 ECF). So it’s working out well with us both playing.

Nigel Davies

Battle Chess & Friends

Here are a couple of neat graphical representations of chess games. The modern game could probably do with more of this kind of thing in order to draw kids in. Moving dull plastic pieces around a board lacks appeal when compared to some of the amazing video games that are out there now, and I suspect that chess has lost many potential players to these games.

Nigel Davies

Wise Words From Maurice Ashley

One of my favourite chess commentators, GM Maurice Ashley, packs an amazing amount of insight into this 2 minute Youtube clip. I’m not sure I’d have run through the moves of a Berlin Defence while doing so, though I’ve also run through some Ruy Lopez moves when interviewed for television.

Nigel Davies

The Comeback Trail, Part 13

I finally made my first tentative step back into competitive chess by playing the Rhyl Open last weekend. It made sense to choose this one as the scene for my comeback, it promised to be a nerve wracking experience and I wanted a tournament where I felt there wouldn’t be too much shadenfreude if I did as badly as I feared.

Having taken a half point bye on the Friday evening I managed to get a win and a draw on the Saturday. On the Sunday I was already feeling more confident and managed to win both games to finish first equal.

The key game was my Sunday morning encounter with Mike Surtees, a highly original player who does well in North West UK events. I had prepared for him the night before and I felt that his line against the Sicilian left Black with a promising position, similar to those White obtains against a dubious line of the Nimzo-Indian Defence. And in fact he found himself in a difficult position early on:

So where do things go from here? Well as my son Sam was good with us both playing (he did well with a win and three draws in the Major) I’ll be entering some more events where he’s playing. As for international events and stuff, they’re going to have to wait.

Nigel Davies

Winning From The Baseline

If chess has analogies with any physical sport it would probably be tennis. Serving can be likened to playing White and the return of serve is like playing Black. Serve and volley players are similar to those with sharp openings who rush out at their opponents whereas others prefer to win games from the baseline.

The following effort is an example of winning from the baseline as I barely moved a piece beyond the fourth rank, despite being White. But at the end of the game Black’s position was absolutely hopeless:

Nigel Davies

Preparation For Blitz?

This was ‘only’ a blitz game but it was interesting to see how far Garry Kasparov prepared. His 10.Ba3 is rare and Wesley So’s answer, 10…c5, is a whole lot rarer. Even so Kasparov played 11.g3 very quickly, and it had a distinct look of having been prepared.

It’s interesting that even blitz games feature heavy preparation now. It makes you wonder what could be in store with a full 30 minutes on the clock…

Nigel Davies

Bela Perenyi

There are many little known players who have played some wonderful games. Among them is Bela Perenyi, a Hungarian International Master who also came up with many creative ideas in the opening. Tragically he died in a car accident in 1988.

It’s well worth checking out his games if you want some inspiration. Here’s a dramatic example of his play:

Nigel Davies