Category Archives: Great Chess Miniatures

My Ode to Odette

My opponent in this correspondence chess game is a French woman who is named Odette. At the time that I am writing this, Odette is in dead last place with five losses, no wins and no draws. Although she is alive (as far as I know) her chances of getting more than a couple of wins or draws is dead. Thus, the ode.

In 1967 American Country singer Bobbie Gentry wrote and recorded a hit song entitled Ode to Billie Joe. In 1976 the song was made into a movie. What is still not clear to me is if the song and the movie are based upon a true story or if this all came from the imaginations of some talented writers.

The description from the  movie on  YouTube is as follows, “A seventeen-year-old boy is seduced into a homosexual act. His guilt over the incident drives him to commit suicide by jumping off the Tallahatchie Bridge, leaving his girlfriend behind.”

If you want to know more about this story then you can click on the following links:

Odette played some moves in this chess game that are about as bad as jumping off the Tallahatchie Bridge. Fortunately, she is alive to play more chess games. Because this chess game is rather short, my analysis below is more about what was not played than what was.

Mike Serovey


Drawing This Correspondence Chess Game Was No Hassell

My opponent in this correspondence chess game is from England and his last name is Hassell. As some of my readers may have noticed, I like to play with words and the names of my opponents!

Originally, I wanted to trade down into a King and pawn endgame or to use my remaining Bishop to go after my opponent’s pawns that were on dark squares. However, when he offered a draw on move number 27 I accepted the offer because I realized that there just was not enough play left in the position to justify my spending my time and energy on trying to win that rather closed endgame.

This cc game is one of three draws that I have in this section.

Mike Serovey


Amateur Versus Master: Game Fifteen

This chess game was played in Tampa, Florida, USA back in 2013. The US Chess Federation (USCF) awarded the title of Life Master to my opponent, Corey Acor, some time prior to this chess game being played. This is one of three rated chess games that I played against Corey and I lost all three of those rated chess games. I believe that this one was my quickest loss to him.

I made a couple of second-best moves early on in this chess game and then blundered outright on move number 12. Things for White went downhill quickly from there. All three of my losses to Corey were due to blunders like the ones that I played in this chess game.

Mike Serovey


I Had a Tiger by the Tail

In this article I am posting two correspondence chess games against the same opponent. He uses the handle TIGER68 on Stan’s Net Chess. His first name is Angelo and he is from Richmond, Virginia.

My record at Stan’s Net Chess is 68-12-6.

In the first correspondence chess game, I won quickly because my opponent blundered in the opening.

In this second game, I missed some strong moves early in this correspondence chess game and lost my opening advantage. I eventually was able to capitalize on an endgame error by my opponent and thus regain my advantage and win.

I am still playing the third round of this match and that game may end in a draw. I need to outscore my opponent by four wins in order to win this match and move onto the next round of this tournament. In the previous rounds, I won every match in four games save one. That one match took five games to win because I lost a game in it.

Mike Serovey


Chess Opening Blunders – a Quick Win

My opponent hung his Queen on move number 19 of an ICC rapid chess tournament game and then said that it was not fair when I took his Queen with my Knight. You can take back blunders in a friendly game, but not in a tournament game! He was lost even before he dropped his Queen.

I joined this event late and got a half-point bye in Round One. This win is from Round Two. I drew Round Three and won Round Four. That gave me three points out of four.

Mike Serovey


If It’s a Car You Lack, I’d Surely Buy You a Hadiak

My opponent is this correspondence chess game is from United Arab Emirates. I do not know his real name, but he uses the handle “hadiak” on  ICC. The handle, “hadiak” rhymes with Cadillac and thus it reminded me of a line in the song, Thank You for Being a Friend.

I won both of my correspondence chess games as White against him and I have yet to play Black against him. Right now, I am declining correspondence chess games on ICC while I get caught up on the 100,000 other things that I need to do.

A detailed analysis of my other correspondence chess game against hadiak can be found here

Mike Serovey


Irregular Move Orders and Middle Game Blunders

My opponent in the correspondence chess game is from France and I do not know his or her real name.

I opened this chess game with 1.a3 so that I could avoid most prepared lines, prevent Black from putting a Knight or Bishop on b4 and to transpose into a reversed opening. I got an English Opening and then the Botvinnik System. Sometimes, I will open a chess game with an irregular or unusual move order so that I can confuse my opponents. I believe that Black was confused in this correspondence chess game.

Quite often, when my opponents realize that I am going to fianchetto my King’s Bishop they will put a pawn on c6 and try to clog that long diagonal with Black pawns. My opponent did that in this correspondence chess game.

I like when Black puts an under protected Knight on f6 because I can often pin it to the Black Queen and then win it. In this correspondence chess game Black broke that pin by playing 12.h6, but he or she then gave me a new target to attack.

Black fianchettoed both of his or her bishops, but then Black left the Bishop on b7 unprotected and I targeted it as well. Although the chess engines did not like it that much, I doubled my rooks on the f file. I expanded my pawns across the chess board, attacked on the Kingside and kept my eye on the unprotected Black Bishop all at the same time.

I opened the f file in order to attack the Black material that was on f6 and f7. Black moved the Knight off f6 and then back onto f6.  Then, Black removed it again from f6 and it remained on the rim for the remainder of this short correspondence chess game. There is a saying, “A Knight on the rim is grim” and Black does not seem to know or believe that saying.

Centralizing your Queen when the majority of minor pieces are still on the chess board is usually a mistake because then your Queen becomes a target for your opponent to attack. Black made that mistake in this correspondence chess game and I gained time and space by attacking the Black Queen. When Black retreated that Queen I was able to win a pawn with a Knight fork on the Black Queen and the unprotected Bishop on b7. Black resigned.

Mike Serovey


Chess Opening Blunders – Another Comedy of Errors

This is another correspondence chess game from the 1978 Golden Knights Postal Section 93. Although I won this game in 18 moves, it was not one of my best chess games.  We both made all kinds of blunders that could have lost the game for us, or we missed opportunities for quick wins. My opponent made a blunder on move number 15 that I did catch and punish. He resigned on what was to be hi 19th move.

I rarely answer 1.e5 with 1…e5. I did so here because I was wanting to play the Schliemann Defense in the Ruy Lopez. That did not happen here. We ended up with the Two Knights Defense. I think that this is the only time that I have ever played this line.

Most of the analysis below is on what was missed by each of us.

Mike Serovey


Opening Blunders, Part Three

This is another one of those correspondence chess games that someone started on ICC without asking me if I wanted to play. I won this chess game rather quickly because of an opening blunder.

Sometimes, I will open with 1.e4 against lower rated players because I am hoping for a quick win with a gambit. When I get the Sicilian Defense I usually transpose into the Botvinnik System. I did that in this chess game.

For the first 8 moves Black set up a pawn structure that was identical to mine. However, his King’s Knight was placed differently. Up to move 12 I got the moves and piece placement that I wanted. Then, Black blundered on move number 12 and dropped a Bishop. Black resigned on move number 16 because I was threatening checkmate and he could not get out of it.

Mike Serovey


Opening Blunders, Part Two

Here is yet another chess game in which both my opponent and I missed a few things. I missed several chances to win and Perilla missed a few chances to equalize. Then, I blundered and just game him the chess game.

This game was played at the Brandon Chess Club when a Life master and I were running the club and the chess tournaments there. Unfortunately, the club fell apart after the master stopped running things.

In this chess game I played a double fianchetto, which I sometimes do, against an unrated player. On move number 18 we both missed an idea that would have won material for me (White). On move number 19 I once again missed a winning move! On move number 23 I missed an idea that would not only have saved the game for me but I also gave me winning chances. Black’s move number 23 was the game winner and I resigned after I made my 24th move.

Mike Serovey