Category Archives: Mike Serovey

I Had a Tiger by the Tail, Conclusion

In a previous article located here, I mentioned my games at Stan’s NetChess where I have a record of 70-12-6. The last two of those wins are posted below.

I am in an event that is called “Greatest Philosophers of the Western World Tourney”. I no longer remember if a player needs to outscore his or her opponent by four wins or if the first player with four wins in the match, wins each match. Either way, I am still waiting for two other matches to finish before I can begin the final round of this event. That round will determine the overall winner of this event. So far, I have lost only one game in this event! If you see my analysis of Round 3 of this match below, you will see that I got away with some opening blunders in that turn-based chess game.

In the final game of this match, my opponent played out a clearly lost endgame. I have yet to figure out why some people will play out hopelessly lost endgames in anything that resembles a correspondence chess game! I am not likely to make a blunder under those playing conditions!

And this is Round 4, the final round of this match.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master: Game Seventeen

Double Dutch Defense

My opponent in this correspondence chess game lives in the Netherlands (Holland) and I played the Dutch Defense against him. That is like playing the French Defense against someone who lives in France.

Although I dropped a pawn on move number 20, the game was fairly even. Both sides defended well and the endgame ended up being fairly closed. I considered opening up the position in the endgame so that my bishop pair could become more powerful, but I decided against this because I was still down a pawn and keeping the position closed made drawing much easier.

This draw kept me tied for first place in this section.

Mike Serovey

Another French Defense Bites the Dust

My opponent in this correspondence chess game was an unrated player who was given a provisional rating of 1800 for pairing purposes. At the time that I am writing this, Mike O’Mahoney has lost to me and one other opponent.

This win put me in temporary first place in this section and a subsequent draw with the other player who defeated Mike has kept me in a tie for first place in this section.

Some of you may remember a cartoon character called Huckleberry Hound. He used to sing My Darling Clementine quite often while walking around. The chorus is as follows:

Oh my darling, Oh my darling,
Oh my darling Clementine,
You are lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry Clementine.

I changed the chorus to the following:

Oh ma honey, Oh ma honey,
Oh ma honey chess player Mike,
You are lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry chess player Mike.

You tried to beat me, You tried to beat me,
You tried to beat me in a game of chess,
But you are lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry chess player Mike.

My opponent (Black) started making minor positional and developmental errors early in this correspondence chess game and was losing rather quickly. Thus, I cannot pick only one move as being the losing move.

Mike Serovey

How Modern is Alekhine’s Defense?

This correspondence chess game was over before this section officially began. ICCF will post the pairings for server-based correspondence chess games two or three weeks before the sections officially begin. This correspondence chess game is one of several that I have completed at ICCF before the sections that those correspondence chess games were in officially started.

This win put me in temporary first place in this section and a later draw has kept me there so far.

My lower-rated opponent decided to gamble with a chess opening that is risky in Over the Board (OTB) chess and ill advised against a higher rated player in a correspondence chess game. After some research online I determined that the best way for White to play against Alekhine’s Defense is to go into either the Modern variation or the Exchange variation. I believe that this correspondence chess game went into the Modern variation.

I considered a sacrifice line that is in my analysis and decided against playing that in a correspondence chess game. However, I may play that in an OTB game against a lower rated opponent.

Mike Serovey

Was the Third Time a Charm?

Martti Mujunen is an ICCF expert who lives in Finland. This correspondence chess game is my third consecutive draw with Martti and the second time that I have played the Sicilian Defense against him. The first time that I played the Sicilian Defense against Martti I played the Four Knights variation. This time I played the Taimanov variation.

I won another game in this section prior to this draw. That win put me in temporary first place in this section and this draw kept me there.

ICCF rules allow the use of chess engines as well as chess databases. White took me out of my database of chess games with his eighteenth move. After that, I was double checking my analysis with chess engines.

Like my previous draws with Martti, this correspondence chess game ended before this section officially started.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Six

This Was a Blunder-fully Short Chess Game!

This is my final win against Benson Walent, so this will be the last time that I pick on him. This seems to be my second shortest chess game against a beginner and my sloppiest one that I have examined so far! I blundered on move number five and Benson started to punish my error. Then, I continued to make more bad moves! However, Benson let me off the hook by making a few bad moves himself and a couple of outright blunders that were worse than mine! In a matter of just seven moves I went from losing to winning.

One thing that has plagued me, as well as inexperienced players, is failing to win a won game. In this chess game, it was my opponent who failed to win a won chess game.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Five

For this week’s article I decided to pick on Benson Walent again. In this OTB chess game Benson played fairly well but he still lost in under 30 moves. The time control for this event was Game in 40 minutes with a 5 second delay. When Benson resigned he was down to about three and a half minutes while I still had 25 minutes. I moved too quickly at certain points in this chess game and thus I missed a couple of chances to win more quickly than I did. Benson took too long to move and ended up in time trouble.

When playing against beginners I can get overly confident and thus a little sloppy. My play was a little sloppy in this chess game because I was playing the Botvinnik system and did not check to see if I had better moves. Also, I will often trade down into an endgame and outplay my opponents there.

In recent events I discovered that I no longer have the endurance to grind out endgames and that strategy does not work well for me when I have no time to rest between rounds. In future rapid events, I will be slowing down in the openings and looking to crush my opponents there and try to win before we get to an endgame.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Four

In my previous articles about kids and chess I posted my losses to kids that were pretty strong. In this article I have posted one of my three wins against a little boy who was a beginner at the time that I played him. Benson Walent was a student of “Coach Mike” at the time that I played him. “Coach Mike” taught his students to play the Kings Indian Defense against anything other than 1.e4 by White. I played the English Opening and Benson went into the Kings Indian Defense as he was taught to.

One advantage of playing system openings is that you do not have to memorize as much. The drawback is that you become predictable. The Kings Indian Defense against the English Opening has never given me any real problems and in this chess game Black started having problems on move number 10. By move number 12 Black was losing.
Benson Walent between adults playing chess

In the photograph above, Benson Walent is the little boy who is between the adults on the right. At the time that this chess game was played, my rating was twice his, I was about three times his physical size and four times his age. I also had White. This gave me a huge psychological advantage! Behind Benson are two masters who are playing against each other on Board One.

The Tampa Bay area has many traditions that I never really understood. One of them is Guavaween. This chess tournament was played on or around the day of Guavaween and thus it was named after that event. You can find some information on the supposed origins of Guavaween at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guavaween

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Three

The chess game below is from Round Two of a Saturday event that had a rapid, sudden-death time control with a five-second increment. In the previous round, I lost to higher rated player and I had about five minutes to recover before starting this round. My concentration was shot!

My opponent was a nine-year-old boy who had been playing rated chess for three years at the time that we played this chess game. I  missed a few opportunities to get an advantage in the opening and middle game. Around move number 40, I realized that I was losing and that I needed to try a swindle. I correctly guessed that my young opponent would not know how to win an endgame in which he had a King, Knight and dark-squared Bishop versus my lone King, so I deliberately traded down into that endgame.

Once we got that endgame, I went to the TD to verify that the 50-move rule still applied to that endgame. I was told that it still does. The TD watched the last 20 moves or so of this chess game with a look on her face that was either confusion or disgust. When my opponent blundered away his last Bishop, giving him insufficient mating material, it took me about half of a second to grab it with my King and declare a draw. The TD turned away with what looked like total disgust on her face! Considering that her OTB rating was about 930 points, I doubt that she understood what I was doing in that endgame and why I was moving so quickly.

With a dark-squared Bishop, Black needed to drive the White King into a dark corner. I ran my King into a light corner (h1) and kept it there. My inexperienced young opponent tried to checkmate the White King in that corner, which cannot be done! Before the start of the next round I explained that he needed to memorize this endgame because he did not have enough time to figure it out during a game that has a rapid time control. I also explained that because he had a dark-squared Bishop, he had to drive my King out of that light corner and into a dark one.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Two

In a previous article, I posted my loss to a thirteen-year-old girl named Sara Herman. I have decided to find all of my games on  this chess blog in which I played a kid (someone under 21 years of age) and put the links to them on this page. Then, I will add another game in  which I played a kid.

Here is my game against Sara’s sister, Rebecca.

Here are my losses to Sara’s brother, Daniel:

Here is my loss to Omry Tannus.

Here is my loss to Roshan Jayaraman. I a game against a life master, Roshan spent about ten minutes analyzing a position that was a rather closed endgame. It took me about 30 seconds to find the moves that Roshan missed. Once I identified the key squares and diagonal that White needed to con troll the  I knew the moves that White needed to play and there was non need to analyze any further. Roshan did not know the theory and therefore his misanalysed the position. The position can be found here.
Old Age and Treachery

Roshan Jayaraman is the kid on the right in this photograph.

A more detailed analysis of this game, with my commentary, can be found here.

Mike Serovey