Category Archives: Strong/County (1700-2000)

Boxing Day Challenge

“A computer once beat me at chess, but it was no match for me at kick boxing”
Emo Philips

One day I stumbled over this doozy and it kept me hooked for a while. You have to admit the position is intriguing and it is hard to let go once you see it. In a way it is kind of like a Boxing Day deal; you get your eyes on it and you have to have it. Let’s see if you can get this deal done: White to move and draw!

It starts easy, doesn’t it? Those 2 pawns must take care of themselves with their king poorly placed near the a8-corner. Of course losing one of them (the e5-pawn is under attack) leads to losing both and then the game is over. One idea could be to bring the king over and that can’t be done right away because the pawns drop (see line A). Hmm, a logical follow up is to have the pawns take care of themselves for a little while and once that is accomplished, white can try bringing the king over. After 1. f7 Rf8 2. e6 … those little buggers can hurt in a hurry; Black’s reply 2… b6 is forced and now we have achieved what we wanted: the White pawns stay on the board longer.

Bringing the White king over looks now like a must. The White pawns are in a Mexican standoff with Rf8 and the king has only one move to play 3. Kb7 … Black of course does the same 3… Kc5 and here is the turning point. I got stuck with the idea of bringing the king over all the way and realized the b6-pawn would win the game for Black after the rook sacrifices itself for those 2 White pawns (see line B). That was one nasty dilemma. The moves seemed all good so far with no alternatives. I left it alone for a number of days. It is always a good idea to reset when you get stuck, leave the challenge on the side and clear your mind. You can come back to it after a few minutes of doing something else or thinking of something different. The challenge still lingers in the back of your mind, but you can return to it fresh and flexible to approach it from a different angle.

What else can White think about using to save the draw after 3… Kc5? The pawns can’t move and bringing the king over loses. Can you think of anything useful here? If you can’t, have a beer or coffee or simply look out the window for a bit. Now get back to it from a fresh angle. The seventh rank is the one helping the rook capture those pawns. You can think about vacating it with your king and could not do it before; now you can. It seems completely counter intuitive and losing since now the Black king is closer and after 4. Ka6 Kd6 (see line C) Black wins those pawns and the game. So much for a fresh angle, eh? If you resist the temptation to turn on the engine and show what you have missed or can’t see, I commend you! You will be rewarded. The solution is right there in front of you and you have all that you need to figure it out. Give it another shot and do not scroll down to see the solution. How can you use all that we have figured out so far?

  • The 2 White pawns are barely hanging in there before being lost
  • The White king can’t come closer to help them out
  • The seventh rank must be vacated by the White king

So, did you figure it out? White reaches a forced draw because the alternative would be to win the game. Enjoy the solution!

Valer Eugen Demian

Two Rooks on the Seventh

Nimzowitsch was one of the first ones to highlight the power of two rooks on the seventh rank in his famous book “My System” published in 1925. Many a player are reminded of it time and time again or are happy to have it as a resource to draw or win their games. This month I got a first hand reminder during one of my online games. It is not that I have forgotten about it, but I simply overlooked it and lost half a point in the process. Lesson 24, level 4 of our app will get a new addition to the existing collection of puzzles on this subject. Let’s see the game together:

Do not dismiss the potential of two rooks on the seventh. Contrary to the popular belief the purpose for such rooks is not to checkmate the opponent or even win the game on the spot. Their purpose is to use their dominance and gain material advantage one can further use to win the game; in our case their purpose was to save half a point for white after a dubious opening and some poor play. Next time I will be far more reluctant to find exceptions (are there any?…) where those rooks on the seventh won’t help.

Valer Eugen Demian

Wanna be an English Trapper?

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it”
George Santayana

Funny how the past becomes important as we grow older. Some moments we remember immediately, others pop up at the right moment or even when we least expect it. Chessplayers have a good memory and that is an important ingredient in getting better. Another important thing is studying “traps and zaps”, expression used by Bruce Pandolfini in his popular book “Chess Openings: Traps and Zaps” from 1989. If you do not have it, you can always create your own from past games you played or have studied. Here is one of mine from the time I was in grade 7:

The English Opening is again popular these days, but was not so much at that time. I liked it because it allowed me to surprise my opponents expecting mostly 1. e4 or 1. d4. I have won many a game because of this. Do you think this trap is too simple or easy to see? You could be right now that you saw it. Hopefully you will not have it done to you from now on; it is not a nice feeling to lose that fast. All I can say is the trap functions today as efficient as it did back then. Quite a few of my students are using it too. It is also only one of more the position offers against unaware opponents. Here is another one played by one of my students a few years back:

Lessons 8 and 9, level 4 of our app have a few more useful traps and zaps in the English. The beauty of it is having the opportunity to add more examples as more unsuspecting victims fall for them. One of my former students managed to finish top 10 in boys U8 at the World Youth Chess Championship in Vietnam 2008 by playing the English exclusively with the White pieces; while he could not collect pieces with his traps at that level, he got pawns and superior positions he converted into invaluable points later on in those games. What more do you need? I will end this teaser article with one of my latest uses of a trap from a game I played online a couple of weeks ago. It was the game inspiring me to write this article. Hope you enjoyed it!

Valer Eugen Demian

The Wrong Rook (2)

“We are our choices”
Jean-Paul Sartre

More than a year ago I wrote an article on the same subject. You can review it here and that could help you figure out the solution to this puzzle as well.


You could say “But this one has 2 extra pawns in it”, so let’s look into why those pawns are on the board. The position has equal material. Re3, Re2 and Rb3 are in a standoff, all being under attack one way or another. An exchange leads to a simple draw since both pawns can either do damage or be captured as shown. In the same time Black’s rook battery along the 3rd rank protects its king from being checkmated and keeps an eye on the f6-pawn.

You might get the feeling in the beginning those pawns are important. Both of them are passed and on the 6th rank. The White king is not in the a3-pawn square, while the Black king is in the f6-pawn square (please review lesson 26, level 3 of our app). The a3-pawn cannot advance at the moment; the f6-pawn can and Black could catch it by moving either the rook or its king. If Black wants to catch it with its rook (1. f7 Rf3), it has to consider Rb3 is under attack and would be lost. That means the only move it really has is 1. f7 Kg7 Next we should look at what White can do about its pawn. Defending it 1. f7 Kg7 2. Rf2 Kf8 leads nowhere fast, so what about promoting it?


Now we have reached a similar situation with the other puzzle. White has sacrificed its pawn and all it has left is to attack the king. Should it do it with 1. Rf2+ …, 1. Rf1+ … or it does not matter? If the king goes toward the h8-corner, White wins no matter what because like in the other puzzle Black loses a rook. We also see in the process why the a3-pawn is needed, as the White king uses it to hide from checks (see line A). Now we look at what happens if the Black king goes in the center and we could observe quickly the difference between having a rook on e2 or not (see line B). Going back to the main line, we conclude it matters which rook is used to check with; one move leads to a draw and the other one to a win. Hope you have enjoyed it.

Valer Eugen Demian

Chickening Out

By now the league season had finished but we were still in the cup, facing Surbiton in the semi-finals. I had yet another white, against former RJCC member Jasper Tambini, who was graded 185 at the time, but is now 202.

I wheeled out my trusty QGD Exchange. Here’s what happened.

1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Nf6
4. cxd5 exd5
5. Bg5 Be7
6. e3 h6

An unusual move order. Black usually plays c6 or O-O here.

7. Bh4 c6
8. Qc2 O-O
9. Bd3 Re8
10. Nf3 Nbd7
11. O-O Ne4
12. Bxe7 Qxe7
13. Nd2

White usually heads for the minority attack with Rab1 here. Bxe4 is another popular choice. My plan of trading knights on e4 shouldn’t give me anything.

13… Ndf6
14. Ndxe4 dxe4
15. Be2 Nd5
16. Nxd5 cxd5
17. Rac1 Qg5
18. Qc7 Re6

He could have played Be6 here, intending to meet 19. Qxb7 with Bh3. Tactical points like this are always important. Calculation in chess is more about spotting this sort of idea than ‘sac sac mate’. Now I might have tried 19. f4, but instead, predictably, head for the ending.

19. Qg3 Qxg3
20. hxg3 Rb6
21. b3 Bd7
22. Rc5 Bc6
23. Rfc1 a5
24. f3 exf3
25. Bxf3 a4
26. bxa4 Rxa4
27. R1c2 Ra3

White’s attacking the black d-pawn while Black in turn targets the white a-pawn. It’s still equal.

28. Kf2 Rba6
29. Bxd5 Bxd5
30. Rxd5 Rxa2

An alternative was 30… Rf6+ 31. Ke2 Re6, switching his attention to the e-pawn.

31. Rd8+ Kh7
32. Rxa2 Rxa2+
33. Kf3 Kg6
34. Rd6+ f6
35. Rb6 Ra7

This is clearly a mistake. Black should give up the a-pawn to remain active rather than moving his rook to this poor square. 35… h5 36. Rxb7 f5 and Black is holding. One idea is Kf6 followed by g5, g4+ and Rf2#, although of course White isn’t going to allow this!

36. e4 Kf7
37. Kf4 h5
38. e5

Giving Black some counterplay. 39. d5 should have been preferred.

38… Ra4
39. Rxb7+ Ke6
40. Rb6+ Kf7

Losing a vital tempo. 40… Ke7 still offered drawing chances.

41. e6+ Ke7
42. Ke4 g6

At this point Jasper unexpectedly offered a draw. My emotions were conflicted. Regular readers, as well as anyone who knows me in real life, will be aware that I’m almost always happy to agree a draw, regardless of the position. As my opponent is a former RJCC member and we’ve always been very big on cultivating sportsmanship, I’d assume he would only offer a draw if he thought he could hold the position. Offering a draw in a position you know is lost when your opponent has enough time on the clock is, to say the least, bad manners. It seemed to me like a position in which, whether or not I was winning, I could press without any danger of losing. But then I became tormented by negative thoughts. Perhaps I would freeze and end up losing on time. Perhaps he’d capture my g-pawns and his pawns would start advancing towards promotion. Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps.

In fact the position’s an easy win for White, as long as I find some fairly accurate king moves to escape the black rook’s attention. For example: 43.Rc6 Rb4 44.Kd5 Rb5+ 45.Kc4 Rb2 46.d5 Rc2+ (or 46…Rxg2 47.Rc7+ Kd8 48.e7+ Kxc7 49.e8Q) 47.Kb4 Rb2+ (or 47…Rxc6 48.dxc6 Kxe6 49.Kc5 with a winning pawn ending) 48.Kc3 Re2 49.Kd3 Re1 50.Rc7+ Kd6 51.Rd7+ Kc5 52.e7 Re5 53.d6 and the e-pawn will eventually promote.

But of course I agreed the draw. Meanwhile, although we were heavily outgraded on all but the top board, a couple of the other games went in our favour. We lost the match 3½-2½, but if I’d played on and won, we’d have drawn 3-3 and gone through to the finals on board count.

What else could I say? A lot, actually, but not now.

Richard James

The Mongolian Tactic Origin

“I will not return alive if I do not defeat the Jin army!”
General Muqali

Not long ago I wrote an article about the Mongolian tactic. You can review it HERE
At the end of it I asked the chess community to help find how this came about and got its name. I am happy one of our fellow chess enthusiasts was kind enough to send me more information. Thank you Martin for sharing it! I have done a copy and paste of his message below for everyone’s benefit. One final quick note before passing the floor to Martin; the Mongolian player’s name mentioned by Yasser was Lhamsuren Myagmarsuren. Hope you will find this useful and please keep your feedback coming!

“This is a short reply to the article “The Mongolian Tactic” where you have asked for the actual origin of the name “Mongolian Tactic” for the tactic you have shown in the same article. As you have pointed out GM Yasser Seirawan states that the name comes from Bobby Fischer. Here is a teaching video on YouTube where he explaines the origin of the name (from Minute 34:30 to 40:30).
Spoiler from here (better watch the video as an explanation because of the amusing story): in a tournament Bobby Fischer was facing some Mongolian player with a very difficult name. After asking multiple times for the name he simply wrote “Mongolian” on his table. This guy was the one who used this tactic in there matches. Greetings, Martin”

Valer Eugen Demian

The Heffalump’s Escape

For my penultimate game of the season I was paired against a formidable opponent in Alan Perkins, joint British U16 Boys Champion in 1965 and student international in the 1970s. In recent years he’s preferred to ply his trade in the calmer waters of the local chess leagues.

My archives remind me that we first met 40 years previously in a weekend congress when I managed to draw. I was slightly worse in the final position but quite probably ahead on the clock. We met again in 2010, in another match between Richmond B and Ealing A, when I lost.

In both games I had white and faced the King’s Indian Defence, trying the Saemisch Variation in 1977 and the Smyslov Variation in 2010. In 2017 I was again White, and it was another Smyslov Variation.

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 g6
3. Nc3 Bg7
4. Nf3 O-O
5. Bg5 c5
6. d5

I’d learnt from my earlier game against Mike Singleton to play d5 here.

6… d6
7. e4

Looks natural, but the stats suggest that e3 is to be preferred. It’s slightly more popular, the choice of stronger players and has a much better percentage. Maybe next time.

7… h6
8. Bh4

Again natural, but the stronger players – and the stats, prefer Bf4.

8… e6
9. Be2

Again, Nd2 is the expert move.

9… exd5
10. exd5

Choosing a King’s Indian rather than Benoni formation. An unpopular decision which also scores poorly for White. If you’re playing a 2200 strength opponent it helps if you know some theory!

10… Qb6

A new move. 10… g5 11. Bg3 Nh5 is the recommended plan.

11. Qd2 Bf5
12. O-O Nbd7
13. h3 Rfe8
14. Bd3 Ne4
15. Bxe4 Bxe4
16. Nxe4 Rxe4
17. Rac1

White has problems with the long diagonal but could defend tactically: 17. Qc2 Rae8 18. Qa4.

17… Rae8

Here there was no reason why Black couldn’t have taken the pawn: 17… Qxb2 18. Qxb2 Bxb2 19. Rb1 Bg7 20. Rxb7 Nb6 and c4 will fall while Black can hold d6.

18. Rfe1

There was no reason not to play 18. b3 here, and no reason for Black not to trade rooks and then take on b3. We’d both misjudged the position.

18… f5
19. Bg3

Again, I could have played 19. b3 and he could have captured the pawn.

19… g5
20. Rxe4 Rxe4
21. Nxg5

21. b3 was still about equal. I was concerned about my bishop being buried alive after 21… f4 but I can always play g3 at a convenient time.

Instead I lash out with a ridiculous sacrifice, hoping to get three pawns against a piece. Or perhaps, aware of Alan’s tendency to get into time trouble, trying to lure the heffalump into a swamp in a deep dark forest. You decide.

21… hxg5
22. Qxg5 Qxb2
23. Bxd6 Qf6

I’d missed this simple defence. I might have played 24. Qg3 to keep the queens on, but instead traded.

24. Qxf6 Bxf6
25. Rc2 Be5
26. Bxe5 Nxe5
27. f3 Rxc4

Now I only have one pawn for the piece. Time to resign?

28. Re2 Nf7
29. Re8+ Kg7
30. Re7 Rc2

30… b5 was the easiest way to win.

31. Rxb7 Rxa2
32. d6 Kf6
33. d7

My passed pawn reaches the seventh rank. Black will have to be a bit careful.

33… c4
34. Rc7 Ra4
35. g4 fxg4

35… Ke7 was the way to go: 36. d8Q+ Kxd8 37. Rxf7 c3 and the white rook can’t get back.

36. fxg4 Nd8

Now Ke7 doesn’t work because the white rook can return via the f-file to stop the c-pawn.

37. g5+ Ke7
38. g6 Ra6
39. g7 Rg6+
40. Kf2 Rxg7
41. Rxa7 Kd6
42. Ke3 Kc5
43. Rc7+ Kd5

The territory’s becoming swampy for Black now as he only has one pawn left and the white d-pawn is surviving. The only path to victory here was 43… Kb4, but it’s not so easy in the quickplay finish.

44. h4 Rh7
45. Ra7

The wrong plan. The way to hold was to get the white rook to the eighth rank to have access to the b-file. So: 45. h5 Rxh5 46. Rc8 Rh8 47. Rb8/Ra8 and there doesn’t seem to be any way for Black to make progress.

Now 45… Kc5 would have put Black back on track, but instead he captured the h-pawn.

45… Rxh4
46. Ra8 Rh3+
47. Kd2 c3+
48. Kc2 Kc4

48… Rh8 was a simple draw, and even Kd4 was good enough. But instead the heffalump tumbled head first into the swamp. Will the tiger put the boot in and score an unlikely and, frankly, undeserved victory?

49. Rc8+

Sadly not. All I had to do to win the game from here was to play one of the most obvious moves in the history of chess: 49.Rxd8 Rh2+ 50.Kb1 Rh1+ 51.Ka2 Rd1 52.Rc8+ Kb4 53.d8Q Rd2+ 54.Kb1 c2+ 55.Kc1 Rxd8 56.Rxd8 and wins. For some reason (or for no reason at all other than having to blitz during a mutual time scramble) I had a brainstorm and decided I needed to check before rather than after capturing the knight.

49… Kd4
50. Rxd8 Rh2+
51. Kb3

Moving up the board because I was scared of mate threats. This is fine but Kb1 and Kc1 also draw, although Kd1 loses. Ironically, without the white pawn on d7 the draw would be automatic.

51… Rb2+
52. Ka3 Rb7
53. Rh8 Rxd7
54. Rh4+

54. Kb3 was again an automatic draw. He could only prevent Kc2 by playing Kd3 when I can just play Rh3+.

54… Kd3
55. Rh3+ Kc2
56. Rh2+ Rd2

At this point I stopped recording my moves. I’m not sure what I played here but it certainly wasn’t Rxd2. The position’s still drawn but it’s easy for White to go wrong now, which is what happened, and Alan just about had enough time to force checkmate.

An exciting ending which I certainly should have drawn, and was, for just one half-move, winning. I really shouldn’t have been allowed to get that close. Perhaps randomising the position on move 21 was justified even though it was an awful move.

You might also think that trying to play a proper game of chess in 2½ or even 3 hours is ridiculous. I agree, but I also think both adjournments and adjudications are ridiculous.

Richard James

Inexplicable Endgame Play

“If you are weak in the endgame, you must spend more time analyzing studies; in your training games you must aim at transposing to endgames, which will help you to acquire the requisite experience”
Mikhail Botvinnik

This week’s endgame comes from a voting match we played as part of one Canadian team during an 8 months period. The team componence (46 players for us versus 6 players for them) seemed to favor us by quite a bit, still getting things organized as a team with so many players is not easy to do. We are getting better at it as time goes on. We have far less “drive-by” players (those who just vote for any move they think of, even moves never discussed) and we have managed to prove to our regular team members that discussing our options before we start voting actually pays off. In this particular game we managed to overcome a so-so opening and shaky middle game play into the following endgame position (White to move):

The general consensus here was that despite the extra pawn, we had no chance to win at correct play. I was one of the members interested to offer a draw, but the team decided to play on. It turned out to be a very interesting experience. Do you agree the position should lead to a draw at correct play? Here are a few reasons for it:

  • The extra pawn is doubled and even if they are center pawns, as long as they stay doubled they are of little use
  • The double rook endgames are far more tactical because of the existing fire power and both kings need to be protected
  • The important h4/h5 pawn moves have already been played, establishing clear boundaries on what those pawns can do
  • White’s plan should be very simple here: take control of the 2nd rank and put pressure on the e5-pawn with both rooks to impede its advancement

Instead of the above White chose firstly to bring his rook onto the 7th rank. Of course an (un)written rule says the best position for any rook is on the 7th rank. We actually have the opportunity to see how any of these rules cannot be applied without making sure the situation on the chessboard warrant them.

The above mistake was important but not decisive. Letting us take control of the 2nd rank, the same idea they tried at the wrong time, made absolutely no sense. That also meant we now had a clear path toward winning. Some may say this second mistake allowed us to win it; in reality they were both connected. The remaining of the endgame was more or less technical. Enjoy the winning line and hope you will learn a bit from it. You never know when your opponents might offer you the opportunity to punish their endgame mistakes in inexplicable fashion.

Valer Eugen Demian

The Fourth Missed Fork

For my next match I was back at Surbiton, and facing Steve Kearney, my opponent in the first Missed Fork game, again with the white pieces.

I went for the Queens Gambit again, but this time chose a slightly different set-up.

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e6
3. Nf3 d5
4. Nc3 Be7
5. Bf4 c6
6. e3 Nbd7
7. h3 O-O
8. cxd5 exd5
9. Bd3 Re8
10. O-O Nf8
11. Ne5 Ng6
12. Nxg6 hxg6
13. Qc2 Nh5
14. Bh2 Bd6
15. Bxd6 Qxd6
16. Rab1 Bd7
17. b4 b6
18. a4 Nf6

So far so orthodox. I might have waited and tried to prevent c5 before playing b5.

19. b5 c5
20. dxc5 Qxc5

Black chooses an IQP formation. He might also have played bxc5, with hanging pawns.

21. Rbc1

21. Ne2, controlling the key d4 square, was more to the point. Now, and also over the next few moves, Black could play d4, trading off the isolated pawn.

21… Rac8
22. Rfd1 Qb4
23. Qb1 Qh4

Instead Black goes for a king-side attack.

24. Qb3 Be6
25. Qa3 g5
26. Ne2 Nd7

Vacillating. There were better alternatives, such as Rcd8, keeping more pieces on the board. I was expecting, and rather concerned about, the consistent 26… g4, but the engines aren’t too bothered, continuing with 27. Rxc8 Rxc8 28. g3 Qxh3 29. Qd6 with more than enough for the pawn. I rather suspect that 28. g3 wouldn’t have occurred to me.

27. Rxc8 Rxc8
28. Nd4 Nc5
29. Nf5 Bxf5
30. Bxf5 Rd8
31. Rd4

Looks natural, but the engines prefer Bg4 or Qa2.

31… Qh6
32. Bg4 Qg6
33. Bf3

Careless. I should have played Qa2 first to prevent Qb1+ or Qc2.

33… Qb1+
34. Rd1 Qc2
35. a5

Not 35. Rxd5 Rxd5 36. Bxd5 Qd1+. Now Black should try 35… Ne4, with equality, but instead makes what should have been a fatal blunder.

35… Qc4
36. axb6 axb6

And here’s the Fourth Missed Fork. I just hadn’t thought about the significance of opening the a-file. Of course, if you know it’s there it’s easy: 37. Bxd5 just wins everything. A sacrifice to set up a check which is also a fork. Time and time again I miss simple tactics by failing to do what I’ve been trying to teach my pupils to do for decades: look for every check, capture and threat.

37. Rd4 Qxb5
38. Bxd5 Rf8
39. Qa7 Ne6
40. Bxe6 fxe6
41. Rd7

Natural, I suppose, when you’re running low on time, but I failed to spot that the black queen can reach b2 to defend g7, when White will have problems defending f2. Instead Qe7 would have offered some chances. Now the game lurches towards the inevitable draw.

41… Qb1+
42. Kh2 Qb2
43. Re7 Rxf2
44. Qb7 Qe5+
45. Kg1 Rb2
46. Qc8+ Kh7
47. Qxe6 Rb1+
48. Kf2 Rb2+
49. Kg1 1/2-1/2

Richard James

“What say you?” The 1 minute challenge (7)

“A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer”
Bruce Lee

A quick reminder about how to do it:

  • Have a look at the position for 1 minute (watch the clock)
  • Think about the choices in front of you and pick the one you feel it is right
  • Verify it in your mind the best you can
  • Compare it with the solution

Are you ready? Here it is: which of the three possible king moves wins the game for White?

This is a very difficult endgame; if you are able to figure out the guiding ideas and guess the correct move, consider yourself a strong player. My take on it:

  • Material is equal
  • White has a chance to win because of the better position of its king
  • It is easy to see White could win the a-pawn, bringing the position into a basic king and pawn versus king endgame
  • If White captures Black’s pawn with its own pawn, key is to hold control of the critical b7-square: if White has it, it is a win; however if Black has it, it is a draw (lesson 19, level 2 of our chess app)
  • If White captures Black’s pawn with its king, it has to place the king in front of the b-pawn in order to win (lesson 19, level 2 of our chess app)
  • On the Black side of it its king should either consider taking control of the b7-square (see above) or attack and capture White’s b-pawn to reach a draw

With the above in mind, we have to choose a move. Which one did you pick? Have a look at the solution and go over it with care to understand all the twists and turns.
The highlight: white uses the opposition to force the black King all the way to the h2-square. That saves the b-pawn, allows white to capture the a-pawn and reach a won endgame. It is kind of amazing how two simple concepts combined together can create such a complicated puzzle, isn’t it? Enjoy!

Valer Eugen Demian