How To Learn An Opening

Openings are the bane of many club players’ lives, a source of never ending confusion and frustration. Which openings should they play and how should they play them? In desperation another book or DVD is bought only for it to be discarded after a few days. Having worked with hundreds of club players I know the issues well and where the misunderstandings come from.

The first problem is that openings need to have a STRATEGIC CONTEXT, which is something that most of the GM and IM authors take for granted. If you don’t understand the strategic themes behind an opening there are no hooks on which to hang the individual moves, so learning it becomes well nigh impossible.

The second problem is that the openings chosen, or the variations within them, are usually way too complicated. This is not the fault of club players or even authors who seem to relish giving critical and highly theoretical lines. The issue is in KNOWING THE RIGHT LEARNING PROGRESSION; as with everything, you need to start simple. Complex material can have its place but it should come later.

The third problem is that most people seem to want to be told what to do rather than figure it out for themselves, and this is not the way to be an expert in something. So we need to cultivate an attitude of being innovators rather than followers, which in turn can have a great impact on the sources we choose to study from.

As nobody seems to be addressing these issues I recently put up three lessons at my Tiger Chess site which explain the process, How to Learn an Opening, Opening Training Software and Doing Your Own Research. You need to be have Full or Video Membership, and logged on to access them, but I believe they these insights will save people a huge amount of time and frustration.

Nigel Davies

This entry was posted in Articles, Nigel Davies on by .

About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days Nigel teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 15 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game. Besides teaching chess, Nigel is a registered tai chi and qigong instructor and runs several weekly classes.