How To Play a Key Game

There was a good lesson in the last round of the Candidates tournament on how to play a key game. Going into the last round Sergey Karjakin and Fabiana Caruana were in the joint lead and crucially were also playing each other. A draw between them would mean that Karjakin would qualify for a match against Magnus Carlsen because of a superior tie-break, but only if they weren’t also joined by Vishwanathan Anand who was playing Black against Peter Svidler. If Anand were to win this would boost Caruana’s tie break after which he would qualify instead.

In this situation many players might pull their punches and try to play it safe, but not Karjakin. Following the advice of Nicolai Krogius in his book Psychology in Chess, Karjakin just played a normal game. And he went on to win with a nice combination and has earned the right to play Carlsen in New York in November.

Here’s a Youtube presentation of the game:

Nigel Davies

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About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days he teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 14 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game.