Inspiration From Another Field

Although published ten years ago and is actually about squash, this article reveals many of the qualities required to succeed in any field.

In the mid-Sixties, in a sport where his peers could be both cavalier and rotund yet still successful, his attitude caused its own revolution. ‘I won through fitness rather than through talent,’ he says, and this stemmed from an unprecedented training schedule and his infallible application to the cause. In 1966, after winning his first British Open championship, he did some press- ups and then, as the champagne was passed round, discussed his plans for Christmas training runs along his home cliffs of Morwenstow in Cornwall.

Such dedication fired an unquenchable desire to win. Michael Corby, for many years No 2 to him in Britain, remembers how Barrington cried after defeat in the quarter-finals of the world championship in Australia in 1967. ‘He cried because he cared so much,’ Corby said. ‘I used to say to him that of life’s many facets, he only had one and he should lighten up. But who is to say that I was right?’

Squash players seem to be exceptional role models in this regard, getting to know Victor Niederhoffer was helpful in learning that my own single mindedness and determination could actually be perceived as qualities. All too often you meet the attitude that it’s better to ‘have fun’ with an activity or be ‘well balanced’, which subtly implies that the pursuit of mastery of a field shows you are in some way defective!

My take on this is that normally people lack the motivation to do what it takes to succeed whilst at the same time wanting to be really good at something. Unfortunately the two don’t go together.

Nigel Davies

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About NigelD

Nigel Davies is an International Chess Grandmaster living in Southport in the UK. The winner of 15 international tournaments he is also a former British U21 and British Open Quickplay Champion and has represented both England and Wales on several occasions. These days Nigel teaches chess through his chess training web site, Tiger Chess, which has articles, recommendations, a monthly clinic, videos and courses. His students include his 15 year old son Sam who is making rapid progress with his game. Besides teaching chess, Nigel is a registered tai chi and qigong instructor and runs several weekly classes.