Kids and Chess, Part Three

The chess game below is from Round Two of a Saturday event that had a rapid, sudden-death time control with a five-second increment. In the previous round, I lost to higher rated player and I had about five minutes to recover before starting this round. My concentration was shot!

My opponent was a nine-year-old boy who had been playing rated chess for three years at the time that we played this chess game. I  missed a few opportunities to get an advantage in the opening and middle game. Around move number 40, I realized that I was losing and that I needed to try a swindle. I correctly guessed that my young opponent would not know how to win an endgame in which he had a King, Knight and dark-squared Bishop versus my lone King, so I deliberately traded down into that endgame.

Once we got that endgame, I went to the TD to verify that the 50-move rule still applied to that endgame. I was told that it still does. The TD watched the last 20 moves or so of this chess game with a look on her face that was either confusion or disgust. When my opponent blundered away his last Bishop, giving him insufficient mating material, it took me about half of a second to grab it with my King and declare a draw. The TD turned away with what looked like total disgust on her face! Considering that her OTB rating was about 930 points, I doubt that she understood what I was doing in that endgame and why I was moving so quickly.

With a dark-squared Bishop, Black needed to drive the White King into a dark corner. I ran my King into a light corner (h1) and kept it there. My inexperienced young opponent tried to checkmate the White King in that corner, which cannot be done! Before the start of the next round I explained that he needed to memorize this endgame because he did not have enough time to figure it out during a game that has a rapid time control. I also explained that because he had a dark-squared Bishop, he had to drive my King out of that light corner and into a dark one.

Mike Serovey