London Chess Fortnight 1975 5-day Open R4

Going into Round 4 I was on 2½ points and expecting Black against a strong player. Instead I received my third white, being paired against another promising teenager, Peter Sowray.

I already knew Peter, who was to join Richmond & Twickenham Chess Club for the new season the following month. Peter, of course, is still very active today both as a player and a teacher, and still very well known to me as a good friend and colleague, who ran Richmond Junior Club for a few years after the first time I left.

This was another long game but there’s really not a lot to say about it. Peter handled the opening in experimental fashion, choosing a type of hippopotamus formation.

1. Nf3 g6
2. e4 Bg7
3. d4 d6
4. Nc3 Nf6
5. Be2 a6
6. a4 b6
7. O-O e6
8. e5 Nfd7
9. Bg5 f6
10. exf6 Nxf6
11. Re1 O-O
12. Bd3 Qe8
13. Qe2 Bb7

Not liking his position, Peter decides to give up a pawn to free his game.

14. Qxe6+ Qxe6
15. Rxe6 Bxf3
16. gxf3 Nh5
17. Be4 Ra7
18. Rd1 Nf6
19. Bxf6 Bxf6
20. Bd5 Kg7
21. Ne4 Bh4
22. Ng3 c6
23. Bb3 d5
24. Kg2 Raf7
25. Rd3 Bg5
26. c3 Bc1
27. Re2 h5
28. Nf1 g5
29. Rd1 Bf4
30. Rde1 Nd7
31. Re7 Nf6
32. R1e6 g4

There was no need for desperate measures. 32… Rxe7 would have given drawing chances. Now I should have played the immediate Rxf7+ followed by Rxc6.

33. Bd1 Bc1

Missing another chance to take on e7. This time I find the correct response.

34. Rxf7+ Rxf7
35. Rxc6 Bxb2
36. Ne3 b5
37. axb5 axb5
38. fxg4 hxg4
39. Bxg4 Nxg4
40. Nxg4

After a sequence of exchanges I’ve won a second pawn.

40… b4
41. cxb4 Rf4
42. Rc7+ Kf8
43. Kg3 Rxd4
44. b5 Rd3+
45. f3 Rb3
46. Rc5 d4
47. Rd5 Ke7
48. Kf4 Ke6
49. Ke4 d3
50. Rxd3 Rxb5

My two extra pawns are enough to win. I have to keep the minor pieces on the board to avoid a drawn rook, f and h pawns against rook ending.

51. f4 Rb4+
52. Kf3 Bc1
53. Ne3 Rb5
54. h4 Bb2
55. Kg4 Bg7
56. Ra3 Rb1
57. Ra6+ Kf7
58. Ra7+ Kg8
59. h5 Rg1+
60. Kf5 Rh1
61. Kg5 Bd4
62. Ra8+ Kh7
63. Ng4 Rg1
64. Kf5 Rb1
65. Nf6+ Kg7
66. Ne4 Rb5+
67. Kg4 Rb1
68. Ra6 Rg1+
69. Kf5 Rh1
70. Rg6+ Kh7
71. Ng5+ Kh8
72. h6 Bc3
73. h7 Bg7
74. Re6 Bc3
75. Re8+ Kg7
76. Rg8+

Black resigned.

Four long games against fairly strong opposition. Four endings, Three wins and one draw, leaving me up with the leaders. As I’d had the white pieces three times I was bound to be black in the last round and my likely opponent was, if my memory serves me correctly, Robert Bellin.

Find out what happened in the last round next week.

Richard James

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About Richard James

Richard James is a professional chess teacher and writer living in Twickenham, and working mostly with younger children and beginners. He was the co-founder of Richmond Junior Chess Club in 1975 and its director until 2005. He is the webmaster of chessKIDS academy (www.chesskids.org.uk or www.chesskids.me.uk) and, most recently, the author of Chess for Kids and The Right Way to Teach Chess to Kids, both published by Right Way Books. Richard is currently the Curriculum Consultant for Chess in Schools and Communities (www.chessinschools.co.uk) as well as teaching chess in local schools and doing private tuition. He has been a member of Richmond & Twickenham Chess Club since 1966 and currently has an ECF grade of 177.