London Chess Fortnight 1975 5-day Open R5

In the last round I didn’t get my expected pairing of Black against Robert Bellin. Instead I had my third consecutive white (and my fourth in the tournament) against Belgian international Richard Meulders.

The game was an English Opening, with my opponent choosing the Botvinnik Blockade, a plan which I had often used myself, and still use now on occasion, having learnt it from Ray Keene’s book on Flank Openings.

1. Nf3 c5
2. c4 Nc6
3. g3 g6
4. Bg2 Bg7
5. Nc3 d6
6. O-O e5
7. d3 Nge7
8. Rb1 O-O
9. Ne1

The recommended plan. The knight’s going to c2 and e3 to enable me to establish a knight on d5.

9… Be6
10. a3 a5
11. Nc2 Qd7
12. Ne3 Bh3
13. Ned5 Bxg2
14. Kxg2 Rab8
15. Bh6 f5
16. Bxg7 Kxg7
17. e3

Forty years ago I was aware of the idea of meeting f5 with f4 to blunt the attack in this sort of position, and that was certainly an option either here or next move. I must have thought f4 was not possible for Black here.

17… h5
18. h4 f4

Black is happy to sacrifice material for a speculative attack.

19. exf4 exf4
20. Nxf4 Rxf4

Of course. The engines prefer White but it’s not so easy to defend this sort of position over the board, especially against a strong player like my opponent.

21. gxf4 Rf8
22. Nd5

This is already a mistake leaving White in a lot of trouble. It looks natural, I suppose, to trade off an enemy piece but I really shouldn’t have allowed the black knight into d4. The correct plan, which is what I played two moves later, was Re1, meeting Rxf4 with Re4, when White has good chances of defending successfully.

22… Nxd5
23. cxd5 Nd4
24. Re1 Rxf4
25. Re4 Qf5
26. Rxf4 Qxf4
27. f3 Nf5
28. Qe2 Nxh4+

It’s not so easy to decide which of five possible king moves is best. The engines prefer Kh1 although it doesn’t look obvious to me that the corner is going to be the white king’s safest option. Black’s still a lot better though. He’ll have two connected passed pawns for the exchange while the doubled d-pawns are both weak. Kf2, holding onto the f-pawn for the time being, is the engines’ second choice but they still think Black has a winning advantage. This position is an excellent example of how well the queen and knight work together as an attacking force.

29. Kh3 Nxf3

The only defence now is Kg2 when Black’s a lot better but has nothing immediate. Instead the game and the tournament end on a note of anticlimax when I fail to notice the mate threat.

30. Rf1 Qg4#

A disappointing end to the tournament but still, overall, an excellent result for me. A few months previously at Ilford I’d demonstrated that I could lose games regularly by making horrendous blunders, but here I proved that, on a good day and with a following wind, I could more than hold my own against anyone below master standard.

Richard James

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About Richard James

Richard James is a professional chess teacher and writer living in Twickenham, and working mostly with younger children and beginners. He was the co-founder of Richmond Junior Chess Club in 1975 and its director until 2005. He is the webmaster of chessKIDS academy (www.chesskids.org.uk or www.chesskids.me.uk) and, most recently, the author of Chess for Kids and The Right Way to Teach Chess to Kids, both published by Right Way Books. Richard is currently the Curriculum Consultant for Chess in Schools and Communities (www.chessinschools.co.uk) as well as teaching chess in local schools and doing private tuition. He has been a member of Richmond & Twickenham Chess Club since 1966 and currently has an ECF grade of 177.