Recognising the Patterns : Challenge # 10

Today’s challenge: Find the typical pattern and react accordingly. White to Move

A.Carmer against P. Zilverberg 1992

Q: Black’s last move was 15…Bg7, was it wise decision?

A:
It was not wise decision as game ended very quickly. It was better to play 15…Nc7 or 15…Qe7.

15…Bg7
16. Qxg7+!!

This leads to checkmate in three moves.

16…Kxg7
17. Nf5+

Double check.

17…Kg8
18. Nh6#

This method of checkmating with knight and bishop is called a suffocation mate.

Gyula Sax against Jan Banas in 2001

Q: Black can’t castle on the king-side. Is castling long preferable?

A: Castling long is not preferable because that loses at least a rook.

19…0-0-0 20.Nb5!!

Threatening checkmate with Na7.

20…Ne5

A tricky move.

If 20…Qb6 then 21. Nd6+ Kb8 22. Nc4+ Ne5 23. Nxb6 wins the rook.

21. Na7+ 1-0

Black resigned in view of Nxc6+ followed by Qxa5 is winning. Of course not 21. Qxa5 then …Rxd1+ followed by …axb5 and Black can get back into the game.

Steinitz Against Brokenbrough in 1885

Q: Of course White is winning. but can you see a way to finish off it quickly?

A:Yes, he can sacrifice his queen as follows:

18. Qxf6!! gxf6

What else?

19. Bh6+ – Kg8

20. Re3

Threatening checkmate with Rg3 or Ne7 and the queen can’t protect both the squares.

20… Qc7 21. Rg3 Qxg3 22. Nc7# 1-0

Even 21. Ne7+ also leads to mate.

Ashvin Chauhan