Storming the Castle (2)

We all have one or more memorable games or combinations close to our heart to keep as jewels forever. How does your chess jewel look like? Is it a well rounded game where your plans went so well, it felt like your pieces were alive and moving alone? Was it maybe the combination of a lifetime? I have a few of each and I bet you all do have them too. Of course we are just mere mortals compared with Fischer and his “My 60 Memorable Games“; still do not sell your jewels short as they also are shiny and memorable. Teaching chess helps me and you rediscover some of these jewels and display them with pride in front of our audience. They are special because they are ours and also because we can add to them all sort of unique details about those moments and thoughts at the time.

A few years ago I discovered the following jewel from a game played in Heidelberg 1946 between what it looks to be two members of the same family. I do not have much more information on it and if anyone does, I would gladly hear from you and do a follow up article on it. Anyhow, here is the position for you to look at and try to figure out what White should do here to amazingly win the game!


It is an interesting position for sure. Let’s have a closer look at it:

  • the opposite-side attacks situation is easy to see and Black has clearly made more visible progress. The a2-passed pawn is a game changing force, especially because of being supported by the Qa3 + Ra8 battery. Black has full control of the queen side
  • the center is pretty much blocked with Nd4 and Nd5 in perfect positions to help the operations on either flank as needed; White has no time to think about doing anything there given the situation on the queen side
  • there is hope for White on the king side with Qe3 attacking the h6-square and the h5-pawn supported by Rh1; however with Black threatening to trade queens, there is an urgency to find something decisive there

How bold are you? Do you have a flare for vicious attacks and decisive sacrifices? If you do, you should feel right at home here. What piece(s) can you think of sacrificing? Do a quick overview and don’t be surprised of what you will find!

How do you feel solving a 9 moves checkmate? It must feel like Superman for a few minutes, doesn’t it? Come up with this in any way, shape or form (including take backs and help from kibitzers) and you have your jewel for life. Now think about coming up with this in an OTB game. The length of the combination makes it a very hard task. The fact it starts with a queen sacrifice makes it even harder (up from very hard?…) because there is no way you can pick up Qa3 and then some; that means you must reach checkmate! Of course the once in a lifetime opportunities do not come around in easy-breezy situations. What do we learn out of this? The length of a combination could feel like a burden; in fact it isn’t a burden as long as you have a clear goal in mind. Knowing what you need to accomplish is of utmost importance, then you also need will and sheer calculation to keep it going. This time it ends up beautifully. What do you do when it does not work out? Well, at least you gave it a shot. That is worth almost as much as solving it. Like Pink Floyd lyrics say:
Don’t give in without a fight

Valer Eugen Demian

This entry was posted in Intermediate (1350-1750), Strong/County (1700-2000), V.Strong/Master (1950 plus), Valer Eugen Demian and tagged on by .

About Valer Eugen Demian

The player - my first serious chess tournament was back in 1974, a little bit late for today's standards. Over the years I have had the opportunity to play all forms of chess from OTB to postal, email and server chess. The journey as a player brought me a lot of experience and a few titles along the way: FIDE CM (2012), ICCF IM (2001) and one ICCF SIM norm (2004). The instructor - my career as a chess teacher and coach started in 1994 and continues strong. I have been awarded the FIDE Instructor title (2007) for my work and have been blessed with great students reaching the highest levels (CYCC, NAYCCC, Pan-Am, WYCC). I am very proud of them! See my website for more information. I have developed my own chess curriculum on 6 levels based on my overall chess knowledge and hands-on experience. A glimpse of it can be seen in my first chess app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chessessentials/id593013634?mt=8 I can help you learn chess the proper way if this is what you seek!