Tag Archives: attack

Quick Decisions

“Choices are the hinges of destiny”
Pythagoras

In April we held the BC Championship qualifier for the continental final of Susan Polgar Foundation Girls Invitational 2017 in St. Louis. It is the second edition for us and the 14th edition for the continental final. This is a tournament exclusively for girls and over the years has helped discover promising talents, plus launch the career of many talented girls in North America. The format for us locally is 5 rounds Swiss or round robin (based on the number of entries) with the games being played under active time control (30 minutes per player, no increment). First place clear or after tie breaks qualifies to St. Louis. The tie break system is a written puzzles test consisting of solving 10 puzzles in 10 minutes or less. We have not had a tie so far, but each time the winner chose to take the test anyway just for fun.

Not sure how many of you are playing 30 minutes per player. This is a good option to play online. There is a decent amount of time to think about what you are doing, as well as it ends relatively quickly; in my opinion this is well balanced. Playing over the board under the same time control is not much different, but one needs to have some practice with it or the time pressure will get the better of you. What strategy you might consider to be successful? Here is my take on it:
1. Opening – you need to have reliable opening choices and play them well. There is very little time you can really spend on thinking about it and if you start guessing, time becomes your enemy rather quickly
2. Middle game – having a solid position will force the opponent to spend time deciding where and how to attack you. This is a good thing! A good middle game position builds up from the opening; here it is important to know typical setups and plans available out of your opening choices. One such setup to consider could be for example a specific pawn structure or a standard attacking idea
3. Endgame – do not ignore it, thinking there is little chance to reach it in such a short time! Being able to play a strong endgame could either allow you to defend stubbornly and force the opponent to find the win (mostly in increasing time pressure) or improve your position bit by bit and put your opponent in time pressure to defend a worst position

The game I have selected is a good illustration of the above. It was played in the 4th round and was of major importance in setting up the stage for the last round and deciding the first place. Black had played very serious up to that point and was rewarded with a bit of luck along the way by collecting wins in round 1 (when she was under assault) and round 3 (in an opposite colour bishops endgame). White on the other hand let a draw slip through her hands in round 2 when she kept the opposition for 3 moves and forgot to pay attention to it when playing the 4th move in a king and pawns endgame; her opponent gained the opposition and got the win. Looking at this position I can add a few details to help you understand better what was going on:
– White managed to play her preferred opening line
– Black decided to go pawn grabbing, probably because this was her first game where she could do that
– White’s clock was running well under 10 minutes, while black had 12+ minutes
– White is a player used to slower time controls, so here the time crunch was her enemy
– Ne5 is very well placed; kicking it out of there should have been high on White’s priority list
– the White pieces are lining up to storm the castle and that is worth the pawn White is down; that was the g-pawn black captured and has allowed white to place a rook on g3
– both Black rooks are not very useful, Rb7 being clearly the worst of them all
Who do you like here? What side would you prefer to play considering the time available? There is no right or wrong answer and it is pretty much based on what type of player you are. Let’s see what happened in the game:

Hope you found this article useful. A number of points could help you in any active game with reflection time up to an hour per player. We will continue to see faster time controls in many tournaments and being ready to play good is going to give you an edge. If you have any games and/ or positions you would like me to look at, please do not hesitate to let me know. I will gladly include them in my column for everyone’s benefit. Looking forward to your messages!

Valer Eugen Demian