Tag Archives: Benko Gambit Accepted

Need Sure Points? Volga-Benko Gambit Edition

“A dream becomes a goal when action is taken toward its achievement”
Bo Bennett (businessman)

A while ago I wrote two articles about Volga-Benko gambit. The first one was based on a game I played and the second one was a follow up with ideas of improvement for Black’s play. You can review the second one HERE
This article is a follow up of idea #3 from it. The main point of both games below is once Black achieves an active setup, that balances out the sacrificed pawn. A balanced position poses interesting questions:
White: I am up a pawn and under pressure. How much risk should I take to continue? If I give back the pawn, my position could be worst and then I have to fight for a draw. If I do nothing, why would I play ahead?
Black: My active position compensates being down in material. If White decides to risk it, I have to make sure I will get my pawn back. If White sits tight and does nothing aggressive, I can also wait and maintain my active position
Hope the games below will be a good starting point in your preparation if you wish to introduce/ maintain Volga-Benko as part of your repertoire.

Game 1: a game played years ago with white looking to surprise black with a lesser known variation. Black managed to setup an active position with ease and both players agreed to a draw.

Game 2: a newer game where both sides made sure they reached a desired setup; once that happened, it felt like a standoff with neither side willing to blink first.

Valer Eugen Demian

Amateur Versus Master: Game Seven

Ricardo Rain is a Senior International Master (SIM) from Brazil and is the only “titled” player in this section. The loss in this game took me out of temporary first place in this section and gave it to Rain. At the time that I am writing this, Rain is in first place with 3 wins and 2 draws while I have dropped to seventh place with 1 loss and 5 draws. I may end up with 1 more loss and 3 wins before this is over. This is my only loss in this section so far and my second loss overall to a master from Brazil.

This game is another one of my losses with the Benko Gambit that convinced my to stop playing this opening in correspondence chess. White allowed me to capture his Bishop on f1, which forfeits the right to castle his King. White has to “castle by hand” as a result of this and that costs him time. Until recently, I won almost every time that this happened! Lately, this has not been giving me enough of an advantage.

On move number 12 Black started a Knight maneuver that was quite common when I learned this opening back in the 1970’s. Now, I would most likely forgo that maneuver and play 12… Qb6.

On move number 16 White starts to cram that a pawn down my throat. Until I can find a better way to handle this I am not likely to play the Benko Gambit again.

On move number 17 all of the chess engines were telling me to play h4 giving away another pawn. That idea never made any sense to me, so I rejected it and played Nd3 because it made more sense to me.

From move number 18 on White had an advantage that I was unable to dissipate or overcome. On moves number 19 and 20 an exchange of pawns moved White’s passed pawn from the a file to the b file giving Black the same kind of problem all over again.

Through a series of Knight and Rook moves Black was able to temporarily block the passed pawn on the b file, but this blockade could not last forever.

With no play left for Black on the Queenside, Black opened up the Kingside on move number 26. This may have been an error. On moves 29 and 30 more pawns are exchanged. Generally speaking, when one is down material one wants to get as many pawns off the board as is possible. So, trading pawns here helps Black some, but not enough.

I spent quite a bit of time analyzing move number 32 and I did not come up with anything better than 32… Nc3 with the idea of putting that Knight back in front of White’s passed pawn.

Move number 33 started a series of exchanges that did not really favor Black but seemed to be the best that I could find in this position. At move number 36 Black has a Rook for a Bishop and a  Knight and is also still down the gambit pawn. With the queens and all of the pawns off the board Black could have held this endgame to a draw. However, this was not the case here.

From move number 37 on White was clearly winning, but I wanted to play this out anyway. It was about this point in the game that I realized that my opponent and I were both analyzing this game on Playchess.com and that we were both seeing the other person’s analysis. I knew what moves he was expecting me to play and he saw my analysis. Part of the reason that I played this endgame out as long as I did was to get as much analysis into both my personal database and also into  Playchess.com as I could.

Black could have played this out to move number 69 but instead resigned at move number 46 in order to free up his time and energy for other games that he had a more realistic chance of drawing or winning.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master – Game Five

This game is from the final round of the 2011 Golden Knights Correspondence Chess Championship. Because John and I agreed to email our moves to each other instead of using snail mail, this game finished well ahead of the other ones in this section. The rest of my games in this section are still in the openings or are transitioning to the middle games.

John is the lowest rated opponent that I have in this section. I lost playing the Black side of the Benko Gambit. This loss, combined with a few other ones, has convinced me to stop playing the Benko Gambit in correspondence chess. I used to win whenever my opponent fully accepted my gambit. Lately, I have been losing whenever White shoves that passed pawn down my a file!

I am the only non master in this section. Therefore, I have no delusions of grandeur about winning this section. I am simply trying to get an even score and this loss will not help me any.

On move number 6 I decided to change up my usual move order because I was hoping to confuse my opponent and thus gain a psychological advantage. This almost worked. John did get confused a little, but I lost anyway.

Whenever White allows Black to capture the Bishop that is on f1 White gives up the right to castle. This is where Black gets his compensation for the sacrificed pawn. I am no longer able to keep my advantage in this variation.

Black completes his basic development on move number 11 and then White begins his assault by moving that passed a pawn down my throat. I still need to find Black’s best reply to that.

By move  number 14 Black is  bringing his rooks and knights over to the Queenside to launch his counter attack. White is going to break open the Center.

On move  number 15 White anchors a Knight on b5 and this Knight creates problems for me for quite a while afterwards.

Looking back at move number 16, I now doubt that trading my fianchettoed Bishop on c3 was the best move for Black. Allowing White to get a pawn on c4 created many problems for me. From move number 21 on Black is losing.

Mike Serovey