Tag Archives: Benoni Defense

I tried to Stack the Odds in My Favour

This is one of my correspondence chess games that was played on the ICC Server. My opponent is this game is from Australia. Whenever I suspect that my opponent will play some anti-Sicilian line I will sometimes alter the move order and play a Franco Sicilian. When they think that I am going to play the French Defense and then I throw in c5 on my second move many of the less experienced chess players will get confused. This usually works only once against each opponent. Sometimes, I have had some difficulty against the better prepared players. Eventually, we ended up with some odd Benoni variation.

I wasted a move when White kicked my Bishop and then I realized a move later that I needed to capture White’s Knight on f3.  I dislike trading bishops for knights, but sometimes I need to.

White tries to get some pressure on the e file by doubling up his rooks,  but I mange to reduce some of that pressure by trading off some pieces.

It took me 20 moves to reposition my pieces and then to get a fianchettoed position.

White managed to keep control of the e file for quite a while, so I opened up the b file and grabbed that file with my rook. That gave me some counter play. After trading off queens neither side had any real advantage.

After trading off some pawns I ended up with two isolated but passed pawns on the Queenside versus a passed pawn for White on the d file. After more captures it was my passed pawns on the Queenside versus White’s passed pawns in the Center. I then set up a clever exchange of bishops that left us with just one passed pawn each. However I dropped my last pawn and I ended up in a King and Rook endgame in which White had the only pawn left on the board.

Once we got into the endgame tablebase I convinced White that the position was even and he agreed to a draw.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master: Game Eleven

This chess game is one of my recently completed games form the 2011 Golden Knights Final. Bonsack is the second master that I have drawn in this section and the second highest rated in this section at 2344. Unless I am mistaken, I have drawn a few 2300 rated players in correspondence chess, but I have yet to beat one. So far, I have one loss, two draws and no wins in this section.

I am moving out of my current apartment this weekend and my opponent knew that I was taking a month off from chess for this move. I think that he felt sorry for me and that may be why he offered a draw in a position that favored him. Whatever the real reason for the draw, I’m glad.

This game transposed into a Benoni Defense. At the points in this game where I say “slightly better is” or “possibly better is”, it is because the chess engines do not agree on the moves and I am unsure myself.

At move number 11 I decided to keep the position closed for a while so that I could restrict the range of White’s bishops. In previous chess games against masters I have gotten burned when my opponent’s bishop pair came to life. I avoided that in this chess game.

Once White’s Knight was firmly established on b5, I could never dislodge it without giving him a passed pawn on the Queenside. That did not favor me, so I eventually decide to go for play on the Kingside by opening it up. That is when White started moving his King over to the Queenside. Not much happened after that.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master: Game Nine

This is a recently completed game that was played on the ICCF server. My opponent is from England and is one of two 2300 rated players that I drew in this section. He is also the highest rated player in this section. This draw has temporarily moved me back into second place out of 13. I doubt that I can remain in  second place because I am losing one of my three remaining games in this section.

This game went only 26 moves and thus it would qualify as a miniature, but it was not a “Grandmaster draw”. I had two pawns for a Knight, but a passed pawn on the Queenside was compensation for the Knight. I also had a fianchettoed Bishop that covered a potential queening square.

I play the English Opening as White and thus I dislike having to play against it as Black. However, in this game I did OK with it. I tried to transpose into a Modern Defense and then from there we got some kind of Benoni Defense. Having an up-to-date database of games helped me get through the opening without any errors. My analysis in the game below includes notes from other commentators.

By move number ten Black is lagging a little behind in development but is advancing his pawns on the Queenside. The trick here is for Black to avoid over extending those pawns. By move number 14 Black has completed his development and the game is even. On move number 16 Black starts a combination of moves that gives Black connected passed pawns for a Knight, but is still fairly even. I calculated at least a draw for Black with this in spite of the slight material deficit. The reader can decide for himself or herself how this game would have gone if we had played it out beyond 26 moves.

Mike Serovey