Tag Archives: chess opening blunders

How NOT to Play Against Stronger Opponents

This win against a much lower-rated opponent put me into temporary first place in this section. However, games that finished after this one did dropped me back into a tie for fourth place.

Going through the crosstable for this section I played over my opponents games that he has finished. So far, he has one forfeit win and about five losses. He will most likely finish in the second to last position. In every game that I looked at, he played the same Carro-Kahn like set up as both White and Black. I sent a message to him telling him that passive play against strong opponents will get him clobbered every time!

On move number 7 White played a novelty that may not have been that good. Move number 12 was also weak because is was played to support move number 14, which was an outright blunder. After Black’s 14th move, White was dead lost. White resigned when Black had checkmate in 5 moves.

I now have enough content in the membership area of my chess site to start taking a few new members to help me beta test this site. I gave Tai one free membership to this site and he has yet to do anything with it. I will take up to a total of 10 free members to beta test this membership area. After that, I will be charging for access to this site. If the beta testers do not give me any useful feedback, then I will cancel their memberships and they will have to pay to rejoin this site! If you are interested in joining then contact me.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master: Game Nineteen

My Queen Did Not Like This Bohemian Rhapsody!

Those of you who are old enough to remember the 1970’s may recall a rock music group that was called Queen. They had a hit song called Bohemian Rhapsody. You can view a video of this song being performed by Queen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJ9rUzIMcZQ

My opponent in this correspondence chess game, White, lives in Bohemia and I have ancestors on my father’s side of the family that were from Bohemia. According to my grandfather, the original spelling of “Serovey” is “Syrovy”. He said that is means “raw”. That is why I m calling this correspondence chess game a Bohemian Rhapsody.

White got me out of my database of chess games on his thirteenth move and I struggled after that. His Bishop that was on the diagonal that runs from c8 to h3 created several problems for me and I was never able to neutralize it.

After analyzing several different ideas at various points in this correspondence chess game, I decided that I was lost anyways so I would try some wild ideas. They may have worked if I stuck this correspondence chess game out long enough, but I resigned at the end of my 58th birthday so that I could spend my time and energy on other things.

Mike Serovey

I Had a Tiger by the Tail, Conclusion

In a previous article located here, I mentioned my games at Stan’s NetChess where I have a record of 70-12-6. The last two of those wins are posted below.

I am in an event that is called “Greatest Philosophers of the Western World Tourney”. I no longer remember if a player needs to outscore his or her opponent by four wins or if the first player with four wins in the match, wins each match. Either way, I am still waiting for two other matches to finish before I can begin the final round of this event. That round will determine the overall winner of this event. So far, I have lost only one game in this event! If you see my analysis of Round 3 of this match below, you will see that I got away with some opening blunders in that turn-based chess game.

In the final game of this match, my opponent played out a clearly lost endgame. I have yet to figure out why some people will play out hopelessly lost endgames in anything that resembles a correspondence chess game! I am not likely to make a blunder under those playing conditions!

And this is Round 4, the final round of this match.

Mike Serovey

How Modern is Alekhine’s Defense?

This correspondence chess game was over before this section officially began. ICCF will post the pairings for server-based correspondence chess games two or three weeks before the sections officially begin. This correspondence chess game is one of several that I have completed at ICCF before the sections that those correspondence chess games were in officially started.

This win put me in temporary first place in this section and a later draw has kept me there so far.

My lower-rated opponent decided to gamble with a chess opening that is risky in Over the Board (OTB) chess and ill advised against a higher rated player in a correspondence chess game. After some research online I determined that the best way for White to play against Alekhine’s Defense is to go into either the Modern variation or the Exchange variation. I believe that this correspondence chess game went into the Modern variation.

I considered a sacrifice line that is in my analysis and decided against playing that in a correspondence chess game. However, I may play that in an OTB game against a lower rated opponent.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Six

This Was a Blunder-fully Short Chess Game!

This is my final win against Benson Walent, so this will be the last time that I pick on him. This seems to be my second shortest chess game against a beginner and my sloppiest one that I have examined so far! I blundered on move number five and Benson started to punish my error. Then, I continued to make more bad moves! However, Benson let me off the hook by making a few bad moves himself and a couple of outright blunders that were worse than mine! In a matter of just seven moves I went from losing to winning.

One thing that has plagued me, as well as inexperienced players, is failing to win a won game. In this chess game, it was my opponent who failed to win a won chess game.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Three

The chess game below is from Round Two of a Saturday event that had a rapid, sudden-death time control with a five-second increment. In the previous round, I lost to higher rated player and I had about five minutes to recover before starting this round. My concentration was shot!

My opponent was a nine-year-old boy who had been playing rated chess for three years at the time that we played this chess game. I  missed a few opportunities to get an advantage in the opening and middle game. Around move number 40, I realized that I was losing and that I needed to try a swindle. I correctly guessed that my young opponent would not know how to win an endgame in which he had a King, Knight and dark-squared Bishop versus my lone King, so I deliberately traded down into that endgame.

Once we got that endgame, I went to the TD to verify that the 50-move rule still applied to that endgame. I was told that it still does. The TD watched the last 20 moves or so of this chess game with a look on her face that was either confusion or disgust. When my opponent blundered away his last Bishop, giving him insufficient mating material, it took me about half of a second to grab it with my King and declare a draw. The TD turned away with what looked like total disgust on her face! Considering that her OTB rating was about 930 points, I doubt that she understood what I was doing in that endgame and why I was moving so quickly.

With a dark-squared Bishop, Black needed to drive the White King into a dark corner. I ran my King into a light corner (h1) and kept it there. My inexperienced young opponent tried to checkmate the White King in that corner, which cannot be done! Before the start of the next round I explained that he needed to memorize this endgame because he did not have enough time to figure it out during a game that has a rapid time control. I also explained that because he had a dark-squared Bishop, he had to drive my King out of that light corner and into a dark one.

Mike Serovey

Kids and Chess, Part Two

In a previous article, I posted my loss to a thirteen-year-old girl named Sara Herman. I have decided to find all of my games on  this chess blog in which I played a kid (someone under 21 years of age) and put the links to them on this page. Then, I will add another game in  which I played a kid.

Here is my game against Sara’s sister, Rebecca.

Here are my losses to Sara’s brother, Daniel:

Here is my loss to Omry Tannus.

Here is my loss to Roshan Jayaraman. I a game against a life master, Roshan spent about ten minutes analyzing a position that was a rather closed endgame. It took me about 30 seconds to find the moves that Roshan missed. Once I identified the key squares and diagonal that White needed to con troll the  I knew the moves that White needed to play and there was non need to analyze any further. Roshan did not know the theory and therefore his misanalysed the position. The position can be found here.
Old Age and Treachery

Roshan Jayaraman is the kid on the right in this photograph.

A more detailed analysis of this game, with my commentary, can be found here.

Mike Serovey

One Good Blunder Deservers Another One

This chess game is from the first round of a chess tournament that is being played on Wednesday nights in Colorado Springs, Colorado. There is one round each Wednesday night and I have completed two rounds so far. I have lost both rounds, and there are only eight players in this section! I should have an easy time with Black in the third round.

This event is being played in a restaurant that is called Smashburger. The food is OK, but the playing conditions are poor. The lighting there is not good and I have to wear a hat to keep the overhead lights out of my eyes. The noise level is too high for me to play good chess. Some of the players are wearing headphones and drowning out the noise with music. However, I have yet to try that. With my hearing problems the music may become just as distracting as the ambient noise there. I doubt that I will play there again after I complete this event.

My opponent in this chess game is older than I am and owns his own computer business that he works with his son. Paul misplayed the opening and I ended up two passed pawns on the queenside. However, I blundered on move number 51 and the game was lost for me after that.

Mike Serovey

My Ode to Odette

My opponent in this correspondence chess game is a French woman who is named Odette. At the time that I am writing this, Odette is in dead last place with five losses, no wins and no draws. Although she is alive (as far as I know) her chances of getting more than a couple of wins or draws is dead. Thus, the ode.

In 1967 American Country singer Bobbie Gentry wrote and recorded a hit song entitled Ode to Billie Joe. In 1976 the song was made into a movie. What is still not clear to me is if the song and the movie are based upon a true story or if this all came from the imaginations of some talented writers.

The description from the  movie on  YouTube is as follows, “A seventeen-year-old boy is seduced into a homosexual act. His guilt over the incident drives him to commit suicide by jumping off the Tallahatchie Bridge, leaving his girlfriend behind.”

If you want to know more about this story then you can click on the following links:

Odette played some moves in this chess game that are about as bad as jumping off the Tallahatchie Bridge. Fortunately, she is alive to play more chess games. Because this chess game is rather short, my analysis below is more about what was not played than what was.

Mike Serovey

Amateur Versus Master: Game Fifteen

This chess game was played in Tampa, Florida, USA back in 2013. The US Chess Federation (USCF) awarded the title of Life Master to my opponent, Corey Acor, some time prior to this chess game being played. This is one of three rated chess games that I played against Corey and I lost all three of those rated chess games. I believe that this one was my quickest loss to him.

I made a couple of second-best moves early on in this chess game and then blundered outright on move number 12. Things for White went downhill quickly from there. All three of my losses to Corey were due to blunders like the ones that I played in this chess game.

Mike Serovey