Tag Archives: Sicilian Defense

Amateur Versus Master: Game Twenty Four

NOT the Latvian Gambit

My opponent in this ICCF correspondence chess game lives in Latvia. This was pretty much a standard Sicilian Defense with no gambits involved.

During the course of this correspondence chess game, I offered a draw twice. White took 15 days to decline the first draw offer and 21 days to accept the second draw offer. He was looking for a win that he was hoping that I missed. He failed to find one. I believe that there was no win for him to find in this correspondence chess game.

I drew my previous game with Guntis, but that game is not yet published anywhere. This draw put me into a tie for first place in this section and I now have second place on tie breakers. I expect to win my remaining games In this section, but that still does not guarantee that I will finish in first place.

Mike Serovey

Was the Third Time a Charm?

Martti Mujunen is an ICCF expert who lives in Finland. This correspondence chess game is my third consecutive draw with Martti and the second time that I have played the Sicilian Defense against him. The first time that I played the Sicilian Defense against Martti I played the Four Knights variation. This time I played the Taimanov variation.

I won another game in this section prior to this draw. That win put me in temporary first place in this section and this draw kept me there.

ICCF rules allow the use of chess engines as well as chess databases. White took me out of my database of chess games with his eighteenth move. After that, I was double checking my analysis with chess engines.

Like my previous draws with Martti, this correspondence chess game ended before this section officially started.

Mike Serovey

Good Luck Chuck Leached This Chess Game from Me

My opponent in this chess game is Charlie K. Leach. He signed every card and letter that he sent to me during our two correspondence chess games with “Good Luck! Chuck”, so I started calling him “Good Luck Chuck” after the movie that starred Jessica Alba. He didn’t get joke at first, but he did after I explained it to him.

Charlie has a brother named Jeff who has the same birthday as I do, but he is five years older than I am.

Charlie played an odd variation as White against the Sicilian Defense and he moved one of his bishops three times in the opening. However, I got too fancy for my own good and I blundered on move number 14. The move before was a bad idea for Black. From move number 15 on I was losing.

I was down a Knight and I was hoping for a draw if I could get all of the White pawns off the board without losing any more of my material. I failed to do that and I resigned on move number 50.

This event was a trophy quad that I won and this chess game was my only loss. I finished this section with three wins, one loss, and two draws giving me a final score of 4 – 2. I finished a full point ahead of the second place finisher.

 

Photograph of my correspondence chess trophy

Photograph of my correspondence chess trophy

Mike Serovey

Another Golden Oldie Chess Game

Here is another correspondence chess game that I played back in 1978. This is also from the first round of the Golden Knights Postal Championship. We both missed a few things in this chess game, but I found enough good ideas and moves to eventually win.

Back then, the US Chess Federation (USCF) had  different rating scale for correspondence chess than the Elo system that was used for Over the Board chess. Back then, a 1300 cc rating was Class A. I don’t remember exactly when they made the switch, but when the did my cc rating jumped from somewhere in the 900 range to about 1800 points.

My opponent got out of the main lines early and allowed me to play a sideline that often favors Black, especially of White does not know this variation. I believe that my notes below explain what happened in this chess game well enough.

Mike Serovey

Opening Blunders, Part Three

This is another one of those correspondence chess games that someone started on ICC without asking me if I wanted to play. I won this chess game rather quickly because of an opening blunder.

Sometimes, I will open with 1.e4 against lower rated players because I am hoping for a quick win with a gambit. When I get the Sicilian Defense I usually transpose into the Botvinnik System. I did that in this chess game.

For the first 8 moves Black set up a pawn structure that was identical to mine. However, his King’s Knight was placed differently. Up to move 12 I got the moves and piece placement that I wanted. Then, Black blundered on move number 12 and dropped a Bishop. Black resigned on move number 16 because I was threatening checkmate and he could not get out of it.

Mike Serovey

I tried to Stack the Odds in My Favour

This is one of my correspondence chess games that was played on the ICC Server. My opponent is this game is from Australia. Whenever I suspect that my opponent will play some anti-Sicilian line I will sometimes alter the move order and play a Franco Sicilian. When they think that I am going to play the French Defense and then I throw in c5 on my second move many of the less experienced chess players will get confused. This usually works only once against each opponent. Sometimes, I have had some difficulty against the better prepared players. Eventually, we ended up with some odd Benoni variation.

I wasted a move when White kicked my Bishop and then I realized a move later that I needed to capture White’s Knight on f3.  I dislike trading bishops for knights, but sometimes I need to.

White tries to get some pressure on the e file by doubling up his rooks,  but I mange to reduce some of that pressure by trading off some pieces.

It took me 20 moves to reposition my pieces and then to get a fianchettoed position.

White managed to keep control of the e file for quite a while, so I opened up the b file and grabbed that file with my rook. That gave me some counter play. After trading off queens neither side had any real advantage.

After trading off some pawns I ended up with two isolated but passed pawns on the Queenside versus a passed pawn for White on the d file. After more captures it was my passed pawns on the Queenside versus White’s passed pawns in the Center. I then set up a clever exchange of bishops that left us with just one passed pawn each. However I dropped my last pawn and I ended up in a King and Rook endgame in which White had the only pawn left on the board.

Once we got into the endgame tablebase I convinced White that the position was even and he agreed to a draw.

Mike Serovey

How Does One Fight a Blind Warrior?

My opponent in this chess game uses the handle blind-warrior on ICC because he is legally blind. He needs to use a special electronic chess board when he plays on ICC so that he gets notified when his opponent moves or sends him a tell. Many chess federations have special rules for blind chess players, such as “touch move” does not really apply to them. His real name is Manny Guzman and he was born in Puerto Rico. He lived in New York City for a while and now he lives in Maui. If his special chess board malfunctions Manny will ask to abort the game and I let him because that is not how I want to win. If I can’t get at least a draw against a legally blind 1500 rated chess player then I need to quit playing chess for a while and go to bed!

I have played against the Smith-Morra Gambit before and I have not fared well in the past. So, in this chess game, I decided to try an unusual move on my third turn. Normally, I do not play my Queen out this early in the opening! However, that worked out OK for me in this game. Manny also brought his Queen out early and I gained some time chasing it around.

Manny’s fifth move was a novelty and I was on my own from there.

As Black I challenged the Center on my sixth turn and we started exchanging material from there. My ninth move was intended to keep the White Knight off e5. Letting that Knight get there would have resulted in the loss of a pawn.

White did not castle until move number 13. Black was lagging behind in development but was making threatening moves on almost every turn up to that point. I never castled and decided to keep my King near the Center instead. White continued to play normal developing moves while Black continued to put pressure on c2.

On move number 16 White goes into a combination that loses material for him. He then follows that up with a horrendous blunder on move number 19. Things went downhill for him from there.

My forcing the exchange of rooks on move number 23 simplified the endgame and made it easier for Black to win. When I am up material I will trade off pieces and go into an easily won endgame. When I am down material I will try to trade off pawns for a drawn endgame. White resigned when he realized that I was up a Rook and was going to queen my passed c pawn.

Mike Serovey

We Had an Even Finnish to the Chess Game

My opponent in this chess game is from Finland.

The first 11 moves of this chess game were pretty much what I expected. I was surprised by White’s 12th move, but it was in my database of chess games.  Once again, I was a little surprised by White’s 15th move. V. Golod has commented that this position gives Black an isolated d pawn, but it is otherwise equal. Blacks’ 16th move was based upon the results of games in my database, the evaluations of various chess engines and upon Golod’s comments. The Golod analysis is included in my subscription the ChessBase Magazine.

Up until move number 18 we are still in my database of chess games. White’s move number 19 is a novelty. The more usual move here is 19.Bd3. After that I was on my own. With a Knight versus a Bishop I thought that it was best to keep as much of my material as I could on dark squares so that this material could not be attacked by the White Bishop.

When I was given the chance to grab the White Bishop on move number 21 I took it. After that, there was some maneuvering of pieces and pawns with neither side getting any advantage. Because the material was even and our ratings were close I offered a draw and he accepted. At the time that I am writing this, this is the only game in this section that is completed.

Mike Serovey

San Pedro Escapes the Four Knights of the Apocalypse!

According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, the original meaning of apocalypse is an uncovering, translated literally from Greek as a disclosure of knowledge, i.e., a lifting of the veil or revelation, although this sense did not enter English until the 14th century. In religious contexts it is usually a disclosure of something hidden. Christians changed the meaning to ‘end of the world’ because the Apocalypse of John is about the end of the world.

In this case, what was revealed is that my opponent does not know how to play the Four Knights variation of the Sicilian Defense and is weak in middle games. However, he avoided the blunders that would have allowed me to win this game. I settled for a draw against an inexperienced player while I was up two pawns. On move number 34 I was inspired to look at an idea, but I got impatient and I rejected it before I realized that it actually wins. I was preparing to move out of my apartment over Labor Day Weekend and I wanted to end this game before I moved out and took a time out from my remaining games. If I had been more patient I would have found the winning ideas. Mr. Generoso was generous in giving me those two pawns and he may have thought that it was the end of the world while he was struggling to draw down material. 😉

I took that lazy man’s shortcut and played the way I had played in two previous chess games. The first time that I had an endgame with my Rook on the queening square and my opponent’s Rook behind my passed pawn was at the State of Florida Chess Championship of 1986. If I remember correctly, my opponent was a 1200 rated player. He blundered by moving his King to the third rank and that allowed me to move my rook off the queening square with check and then queen the passed pawn. The second time I had this kind of endgame I played more than 60 moves before I realized that I could not force a win and that my opponent was not going to blunder. After this game I am going to endeavor to avoid having my Rook in front of a passed pawn again!

This game was my second draw and Pedro’s only draw so far. What is even more embarrassing for me is that Pedro has three losses so far in this section. At the time that I am writing this I have four draws and no wins or losses in this section. I need to win at least one of my two remaining games in order to get second place in this section.

Mike Serovey

Failing to Win a Won Game, Part 1

This game is from Round 1 of my most recent Over the Board (OTB) chess tournament played in Colorado Springs, Colorado. This game illustrates a number of points that I want to make. First, I am not ready to play chess before noon! Second, this is one of too many games in which I outplayed my opponent in the opening and still lost the endgame! This clearly illustrates that no game is over until it is really over. Third, I don’t play well when I am not properly rested or ill. Fourth, sometimes kids will beat experienced players because the kids are healthy while we older adults often have chronic health problems. And fifth, I really do need to slow down when I am winning so that I don’t blow the win again!

I learned this opening back in 1975 from my younger brother, Steve. He got it from his only chess book, MCO 10. What we both liked about this variation was all of the traps that our young opponents often fell into. Back then it was called the Four Knights variation of the Sicilian Defense. Now, it is called some kind of Taimanov Variation of the Sicilian Defense. I will always call it the Four Knights Variation. Another thing that I like is that most of my OTB opponents do not know the main lines so I usually get an opening advantage.

After falling into an opening trap, I failed to find the best move to play on my tenth turn. Even so, I was still winning. My opponent gave me plenty of chances to either win or draw this game and I missed about half of them. Throughout most of this game I was feeling dizzy and light-headed. This could have been caused by not eating enough breakfast or from my sensitivity to rainy weather. Either way, my USCF standard rating has been at or near its floor of 1500 for about ten years now! These one-day tornados have killed my rating!

When I first started playing rated chess back in November of 1974 the typical first time control was 40 moves in 60 minutes. The second time control was sudden death in 30 minutes with any time that was left over from the first time control being carried over to the second one. That gave me an average of a minute and a half per move and I could pace myself accordingly. Now, I tend to rush my moves if I get more than 10 minutes behind my opponent.

Back around 1976 an expert in Texas named David Wheeler asked for some games in which the Four Knights was played. I sent him some that Steve and I played and he used two of them in his booklet. As a result of using our games David sent me a free copy of his booklet. I am planning to do something similar with my games. Any book on the Taimanov Sicilian or good database will cover the main lines of this opening. My intent is to write a book for the club player and feature lines that will be more likely seen in OTB games against non masters.

All of my notes are included in the game below.

Mike Serovey