Teaching Kids Through Classical Games (12)

Capablanca,Jose Raul – Fonaroff,Marc
New York , 1918

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0–0 d6

4…Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 is the so called Berlin wall, but that’s another story.

5.d4 Bd7

5…exd4 6.Qxd4 Bd7 7.Bxc6 Bxc6 leaves White with more space in the center.

6.Nc3 Be7 7.Re1

It is always been a good idea to ask what the opponent’s plan is. In this position White is threatening to win pawn, for example after 7…0–0 8.Bxc6 Bxc6 9.dxe5 dxe5 10.Qxd8 Raxd8 11.Nxe5 white is a pawn up, and if
11…Bxe4 12.Nxe4 Nxe4 then 13.Nd3 f5 14.f3 Bh4 15.g3 Nxg3 16.hxg3 Bxg3 leaves White a piece up for two pawns.

7…exd4 8.Nxd4 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 Bxb5 10.Nxb5

What has more space.

10…0–0 11.Qc3

Q: Please explain the logic behind Qc3.
A: It vacates the d4 square for White’s knight which can then head for f5. A very straight forward approach.

11…c6 12.Nd4 Nd7 13.Nf5

Checkmate is threatened.

13…Bf6 14.Qg3 Ne5 15.Bf4 Qc7 16.Rad1 Rad8

Q: Black has only one weakness on d6. How can you exploit it?
A: After 17.Qa3 Nc4 18.Qb4 the pawn on d6 is lost. But Capablanca had a different approach in mind.

17.Rxd6

17…Rxd6 18.Bxe5

Pause for the moment and see how you can save Black.

18…Rd1??

Here the computer suggests 18…Qa5 as the only move which can save the game, but Capablanca’s opponent failed to see it. The threat is to take both the rook and bishop, so 19.Bc3 forced after which 19…Bxc3 20.bxc3 Rg6 21.Ne7+ wins the exchange back.

19.Rxd1 Bxe5

Q : How white can finish off his opponent (hint – there is a possible back rank weakness)?

20.Nh6+!! Kh8 21.Qxe5 Qxe5 22.Nxf7+

Th point of whole combination that started with 17. Rxd6. Black resigned as he is piece down. And if 22… Rxf7 23.Rd8 and mate follows or 22…Kg8 23. Nxe5

1–0

Ashvin Chauhan