Victor Was Not Victorious

Back in the 1980’s and 1990’s I played three or four rated chess games against Victor E. Hakala. I lost one of those chess games and I won the rest of them on time forfeit. A search on Google for one of his photographs informed me that Victor died back in 2001. I was unable to find a photograph of Victor, but I remember that he bore a strong resemblance to Grandmaster Pal Benko. Victor E. Hakala also had Benko’s tendency to get into time trouble, but not GM Benko’s overall talent!

In the chess game below from 1990, Victor played the Colle System. This is one of the few times that I have won against it, but this win was on time forfeit. All of my wins against Victor E. Hakala were on time forfeit! The advantage changed hands several times during this chess game and we both missed a few things! When Victor started to get into time trouble it seems that I just tried to run him out of time and that I stopped looking for the best moves on the chess board. Victor completed his thirtieth move and then his flag fell before I could reply. I failed to note what the time control was for that chess game.

Victor’s fourth move was a novelty and is not in my database of games. It seems that he was the only one to try that move against me. His fifth move was not the best and it brought his Queen out early. I continued to develop normally. I castled early while White delayed castling for a few moves. On move number ten I started to gain time by harassing White’s Queen and Bishop. On move number 15 I failed to prevent a move that White missed. My seventeenth move and White’s eighteenth were both errors because we both missed a good  move for White. By move number 21 we had reached equality. On move number 25 White recaptured with the wrong Knight and I missed the win of a pawn. I had several chances to take that pawn and I never did. The position was even when Victor overstepped the time control.

Mike Serovey