Why Nf6 is Better Than Ne7 (A Trap)

This article is aimed at beginners only. Like other beginners, when I was in the initial stage of learning chess I was really attracted by chess traps in order to register quick wins.

What I am going to show you is not really a trap because you’re not offering anything. It’s just a wayto punish your opponent for developing a piece on wrong square. In general, while playing king’s pawn openings, …Nf6 is much better than …Ne7 because of the knight’s influence on center. Meanwhile a more critical task of Nf6 is to protect the king. If this is ignored it is usually decisive, and in my database I found 2 games where players rated over 2000 played. Clearly there is a greater chance that beginners will make this mistake, here is the sequence of moves I am talking about:

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. d3 d6 5. 0-0 Ne7? 6. Ng5! and White is winning at least a pawn by force.

The game between Vasco Diogo (2220) vs Jose Maria (2051) continued with 6…d5, the only move that might prolong the fight. The game proceeded with the moves 6… d5 7. exd5 Na5 8. Nc3 Nxc4 9. dxc4 Ng6 10. Qh5 Be7 11. f4 Bxg5 12. fxg5 Qe7 13. Ne4 Qb4 14. b3 Bd7 15. Be3 b6 16. Rf2 O-O-O 17. c3 Qa3 18. g3 a5 19. c5 Ne7 20. Bc1 1-0

As we’re discussing this from the beginners’s point of view, they might consider Ng5 bad as they can simply castle, and White is moving the same piece twice in the opening! But this can also result in disaster for Black as follows:

6… 0-0 7. Qh5!

The Greco setup, a deadly way to attack the castled king in the absence of natural defender.

7…h6

7…Re8 fails to 8. Bxf7+ Kf8 9. Nxh7# or Kh8 then Qxh7#

8. Nxf7 – Rxf7

8…Qe8 leads to typical checkmate 9. Nxh6++ Kh7/h8 10. Nf7+ Kg8 11.Qh8#

9. Qxf7 is winning.

I experienced this pattern many times in Queen’s Pawn Openings too. When White’s bishop is on the b1-h7 diagonal but Black’s knight on g6, and that gives some chances with Ng5 and Qh5!!.

Ashvin Chauhan